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How to leave a new job gracefully...

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larussel03

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OK, so as I've posted previously, I'm not super thrilled with my new job. I am frequently bored, I don't have enough work to do, and I don't always get more work when I ask (sometimes the manger I ask is too busy and seems frustrated that I'm giving her something else to think about). I also just don't fit in at my work (super small company where everyone is at least 15 years older than I am, and I really don't think they take me seriously b/c of my age, which is such a change b/c before I moved to Ann Arbor I worked at a research institute where I was treated as an equal and given tons of work, which was a good thing).

So, I've put out my resume and already gotten 2 calls back (I put it out last night). In my work description for my current company, they specifically say that I have the right to leave at any time, with or without notice, and they have the right to dismiss me at any time, with or without notice, so giving notice isn't the big deal here.

The big deal is I've only been at this position for 3 months, and once I find something else I want to leave, but I don't know the best way to tell them that once I've found a new position. How do you tell your boss you're leaving???

ETA: also, how do you get time for interviews?
 

Sundial

Ideal_Rock
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Mar 14, 2005
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I supervised many employees during my years in the workplace and I would never give a good recommendation to someone who didn't give at least two weeks notice. Maybe your job position is different, but just because they say you can leave whenever you want doesn't mean that they don't want the courtesy of some time to find a replacement. As far as how to give notice I think you should just tell them straight out that you didn't feel your skills were being fully utilized and you are taking a new position that seems to be a better fit for you. Try to squeeze in your interviews during lunch or see if they will work with you on after hours appointments.
 

larussel03

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Date: 1/22/2007 10:26:46 AM
Author: Sundial
I supervised many employees during my years in the workplace and I would never give a good recommendation to someone who didn''t give at least two weeks notice. Maybe your job position is different, but just because they say you can leave whenever you want doesn''t mean that they don''t want the courtesy of some time to find a replacement. As far as how to give notice I think you should just tell them straight out that you didn''t feel your skills were being fully utilized and you are taking a new position that seems to be a better fit for you. Try to squeeze in your interviews during lunch or see if they will work with you on after hours appointments.
Yeah, I agree, I would feel badly about giving less than 2 weeks notice unless it was absolutely necessary, plus I''d want to finish up the few projects that I am working on and give my sales manager adequate notice (she''s my favorite here, although she works offsite in a different state--I have 3 managers, really).

I honstly feel badly leaving period, but I''m just not happy and being bored can often be sort of torturous and I just need to be busier.
 

Finding_Neverland

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Jan 10, 2007
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A very good friend is the hiring Manager of a significant number of employees. I remember once he was talking about interviewing candidates to fill a position. One guy in particular told him he could start work there the next day. My friend said "No Way" would he hire this guy. I asked why. Friend said, "If the guy won''t give his current employer notice, he''ll do the same to me." Leave him stranded one day scrambling to cover the work load.

Give your current employer notice that you''re leaving. Keep it simple and sweet.

I tender my resignation effective at close of business (or name a time) on whatever date, a Friday 2 weeks out. Thank you for the opportunity to grow professionally and learn from you.

Even if you haven''t grown or learned a thing, be nice. Don''t put anything in that letter that could come back to bite you in the butt later. More than 2 weeks notice, you''re dragging things out.
 

Dee*Jay

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Sweetpea, I don''t think there''s anything wrong with leaving a job that''s not a good fit as long as you do it the right way. Giving two weeks notice is a must, and I would be very (gently) honest with your manager, telling him/her that while you appreciate the opportunity of having worked for the company you feel that you''ve found a better fit elsewhere and you feel it''s best if you move on.

As for finding time for interviews, whenever I''ve interviewed and the potential hiring company has been aware that I had another job they were generally accommodating of my schedule. Either early morning or late afternoon/evening appointments, or even lunchtime if the two places were close together. As an absolute last resort you could "manufacture" a dentist appointment or something like that, but I hate to be deceptive if there''s a way around it.
 

zoebartlett

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Dec 29, 2006
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12,450
Hi Sweetpea! I''m sorry to hear that you''re not happy at work. No matter what your company''s official policy is regarding giving notice, I think it''s only professional to give 2 weeks. I''ve left a job that I was miserable at and I had only been there for 3 months. I always said that I would give it a longer period of time, but I knew that I just couldn''t. I ended up going to grad school full-time after leaving my job, with a month in between. It was a hard decision but SO worth it. As soon as I left my job, it felt as if a huge weight had been lifted off my shoulders and I could focus on new endeavors. I hope you are able to feel that way. I agree with Dee*Jay -- try to schedule interviews around your work hours. Most hiring companies understand that candidates are currently working elsewhere and they can be accomodating.

Best of luck! Please let us know what happens.
 

Mara

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Joined
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31,003
I''d give two weeks and I would just be honest. I would say that this job doesn''t offer you a challenge and that you have found something that better fits your needs. That you want to finish up your project and leave on good terms.

Typically I get bored around a year at a company, that''s how long it takes for me to learn pretty much everything and tap out mentally, so unless there''s always something new to do ... I don''t do very well long term pidgeonholed into kind of the same positions. But I''ve never had a problem with it, especially here in the bayarea where people tend to move around a fair amount though I have noticed as I have gotten older, I tend to stay longer like 2-2.5 years before I want to move on.

Anyway do not feel bad for looking out for yourself, trust me the company would not be looking out for you if the tables were turned, give your 2 weeks, be nice and leave when it''s up.
 

larussel03

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Oct 22, 2005
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1,747
Date: 1/22/2007 11:28:41 AM
Author: Mara
I''d give two weeks and I would just be honest. I would say that this job doesn''t offer you a challenge and that you have found something that better fits your needs. That you want to finish up your project and leave on good terms.

Typically I get bored around a year at a company, that''s how long it takes for me to learn pretty much everything and tap out mentally, so unless there''s always something new to do ... I don''t do very well long term pidgeonholed into kind of the same positions. But I''ve never had a problem with it, especially here in the bayarea where people tend to move around a fair amount though I have noticed as I have gotten older, I tend to stay longer like 2-2.5 years before I want to move on.

Anyway do not feel bad for looking out for yourself, trust me the company would not be looking out for you if the tables were turned, give your 2 weeks, be nice and leave when it''s up.
I hear you on the getting bored after learning everything--in my position in Boston it took about a year or so to learn everything about my job, and there was no room for promotion at the time, but I was there for about 2 years since I still found the work rewarding and I was moving to Ann Arbor in the fall. I mean, at the end i was very bored, but part of that could have been b/c I knew I was moving.

In Boston it made more sense to move around, like in your area, b/c people tend to do so after 2 or 3 years. They go back to grad school/get promoted/ move to a different company even switch careers completely. There''s an abundance (or moreso) of work there so it''s not so hard.

Here is a different story. MI''s economy is not so great right now and jobs can be kind of hard to come by, so I almost feel guilty leaving, but I''ve been looking into sales or marketing positions that offer training, and they seem to be very responsive to me so far.

Hopefully I''ll be able to squeeze in some interviews this week--one wants one tomorrow (ack! I need a new suit!) and one Friday.....I havnet called them back yet though, I''ll prob do so after lunchtime, but def before 5.
 

movie zombie

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 20, 2005
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11,879
yep, minimum 2 weeks notice. interviews at lunch, after work, even before work. an honest exit interview....nothing you would want held against you in case you have to ask for a reference at a later date. and it can happen that you will want a reference from them at a later date......while it is not unusual in this area to job hop after a short stint, the question always comes up as to why...again be honest that the work wasn''t challenging enough....and that you left on a good enough footing to not mind authorizing contact if requested.

getting out now is preferable to waiting a year. employers will also question why you stuck with a position that wasn''t a good fit for a year when you knew it at 3 months.

movie zombie
 

Mara

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Oct 30, 2002
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31,003
i agree with MZ re the whole employers respecting your want to leave to pursue more challenging opportunities, typically when i am honest with future employers about why i want to leave, aka not challenged anymore, no room for growth etc...they are pretty responsive and they like the idea that you just don''t sit there twiddling your thumbs etc. and on when to interview...i would go at lunch or before or after work but if you can''t get around scheduling something at like 2pm or 3pm or whatever...then i just say i have a personal appt or something and have to take an hour or so off.
 

larussel03

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Joined
Oct 22, 2005
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1,747
Thanks everyone for the advice so far! I really appreciate it!

Another question--who do I tell I''m leaving? Do I just tell the CEO (we only have 10 people in the company, so he''s the one who interviewed and hired me), or the CEO and VP or those 2 plus my manager?
 

AChiOAlumna

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Joined
Mar 10, 2005
Messages
1,678
I just went through this this past Fall. I've been working for a company part-time and found another job that accommodated my needs more. I had typed up a letter of resignation and was holding on to it for the "right time" to send it off.

One night, my boss had called me (this was a telecommunication-type job, so it wasn't uncommon for him to call me at all hours of the day) wanting to send me some new supplies to use for upcoming projects. I had to lower the boom! I told him that it would be unnecessary to send the items due to the fact that I was needing to resign. I told him that my schedule needs had changed and his schedule for me was not meeting the needs of my family and personal life (aka balance!!!)...he was having me work almost EVERY weekend and I needed to use that time to be with my family.

Although he was disappointed, we left on good terms. He even asked that if he needed me in a pinch, would I be willing to step in. I told him that he could always call me, but I couldn't guarantee my weekend availability anymore. Since then, he's even told me that I could come back at any time if I so chose.

I know that won't be happening, but it was nice that we left it on good terms.

BTW...I gave him 6 weeks notice. I agreed to finish out my schedule for the calendar year (which was from November to the beginning of December) as it was already on my schedule and I had made the commitment months earlier.
 

grapegravity

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Nov 24, 2003
Messages
486
I just gave my manager 2 weeks notices today and she''s really happy that I gave her 2 weeks so she can plan what to do once i leave... I told her the truth how I got a better offer and I want to try a different work environment.... And she''s actually happy for me.. I think the key is the give your current employer sufficient notice so they can find someone to replace you and just be honest with them... Best of luck to you!
 

:)

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Jul 25, 2006
Messages
1,864
You have gotten really good advice. I would let my manager know first out of respect (so that he/she doesn''t get caught like a deer in the headlights and look like he/she doesn''t know what is going on in his/her department if/when someone says something), then the CEO.
 

larussel03

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Oct 22, 2005
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I think I''m going to call back 2 of the 5 employers that called me today, I''ll just have to leave work for a few minutes or a little early...(we''re technically only required to be here b/w 9:30 and 3:30, so no one will notice if I leave at 4:30, especially since I usually stay late). I''ll prob leave messages for the other 3 b/c it''ll likely be after 5 once I can call them--I had an unusually busy day today, so I didn''t manage to get away and now it''s almost time to leave...

Wish me luck!
 

Mara

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i typically just let my reporting manager or director know i'm leaving and figure it's their responsiblity to tell anyone else that might need to know. i have never in my history let anyone else know besides who i directly report to. maybe it's a geographical thing?! or an industry thing?
 

larussel03

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Oct 22, 2005
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Date: 1/22/2007 3:40:03 PM
Author: Mara
i typically just let my reporting manager or director know i''m leaving and figure it''s their responsiblity to tell anyone else that might need to know. i have never in my history let anyone else know besides who i directly report to. maybe it''s a geographical thing?! or an industry thing?
Yeah it''s hard b/c I don''t have a "real" manager...there are basically just a few people who direct me, I guess, and I report to different people for different tasks (ie: whoever asked me to do something, I report the results back to them). The roles here are not very clearly defined and I don''t want to appear evasive by going to one and not the CEO guy that I interact with daily, but I don''t want to meet with everyone individually b/c it''s uncomfortable.
 

curlygirl

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2,637
I agree with what everyone else has said. Don't stay somewhere if you are unhappy. I have an employee who is doing that to me right now and I'm not happy. She moved here from LA for this job (she was working in our office out there but is from NY and wanted to move back) and she promised she'd give me a year. After about 3 months, I could tell she was not happy about it and talked to her extensively so she could have an out. She didn't take it--she decided to stay and suck it up and work harder, etc. Now, 3 months later she's decided that she really can't handle the job and has given me her 2 weeks notice. I'm upset because she committed to a year but if she's not happy, I can't force her to stay based on a verbal agreement. But I'm even more upset because I'm almost 6 months pregnant and I have to get someone in here so I can train them and go on my maternity leave without worrying about having a new person here. If she had quit when I gave her the opportunity 3 months ago, I would be in a much better situation than I'm in now.

Also, I don't know how your company works but here we have a 90 day "probation" period. So if you decide within that time period that you are unhappy, you can leave--no questions asked. And by the same token, if your supervisor isn't happy with you, he/she can ask you to leave within that 90 days with no repercussions. I had to do that once--I let a guy go after about 2 months and he was like, "I thought I get 90 days!" I was like, "No, I get 90 days!"

Anyway, good luck to you and don't sweat it. You're doing the right thing and it sounds like you'll have a new job in no time!
 

Rosebud8506

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Jul 10, 2006
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665
Sweetpea: I agree on the two weeks thing. You''ll at least remain on good terms with your current employer if you let them know, and then in the future you can always use them as a reference. They may in fact decide to let you leave earlier than that if they really do not need you to continue on upcoming projects.

I can totally hear what you''re saying with with job market here in MI. I have been out of work since early August and still nothing!!! it''s probably the worst economy its ever been, and not very promising. Good job for you getting call backs so soon!! I hope you hear something!
 

larussel03

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Oct 22, 2005
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So, I had a phone interview last night, and it seemed to go really well. It was for a mortgage company, and the interviewer set me up with an in-person interview. The only thing is that after talking over the position with my fiance, I had to cancel the interview. First off, the office is 40 minutes away without traffic. Secondly, it is a nationwide company, so I''d be required to work minimum 11 hour days (the interviewer told me this). At first I didn''t think it was that bad, I LOVE being busy and it sounded like I would be extremely busy at this position, and something I could be good at, but once he and I talked about it I decided 11 hours IS a really long day. Plus we have the dog and we need to make sure that someone can be home at 5 or 6 to be with her, feed her, walk her, etc, and I can''t put that ALL on him.

At noon I''m going to call another company to set up an interview. Maybe that will be more amenable to my and FI''s schedules.
 

larussel03

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Another thing--

I''ve never sent a letter of resignation before. At my previous position, I gave them like 6 months notice because I knew i''d be moving, so they never asked for one. Do you send it via email, give it to the person, or mail it? Before or after you tell them that you''re giving your 2 weeks?
 

larussel03

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I''ve got 2 interviews now! One is this week and one next week! Both are towards the end of the day, so I''ll only have to take about 1.5 hours off both days!
 

Rosebud8506

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665
Good for you!!! I was thinking about this thread you started, and I got up this morning, went to the gym, and then checked my VM and I had gotten a call too for a prospect job, haha. However, I tried calling back the person that called me (couldn''t really understand the last name?) and their VM picked up and it was one of those pyramid companies that little naive me had fallen for back in college - a big disappointment


It''s a good thing you guys talked it out about the 11 hr day job- oye!! that would def. be enough for me. I was offered something that was similiar working downtown Detroit for a big name insurance company and it would have been the similiar, long hours and the drive would be enough to turn me away. It''s something you really have to think about. Also, if you and you FI are soon to start a life together & a family, its not only a decision made for whats best for you, but now the BOTH of you. That is something I had to come to grips with too while on the job search.
 

ephemery1

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1,724
Leaving a job is NEVER fun, but it sounds like you are absolutely doing what is right for you, so hopefully everyone in your current workplace will understand that. And if they don't, too bad for them!


As for the letter of resignation, the two jobs I've left, I typed it up and gave a signed hard copy to everyone involved. Because the most recent job was at a university, the process was somewhat complex... I notified the dean of my office first, the director next, and the dean of the college after that. The first guy (dean of my office) actually ripped it up and said he refused to accept it...
Then he pasted it back together and crossed off my signature and put another employee's name on it instead... just being funny.
He was one of my favorite bosses, but the job wasn't right for me, and I decided to go back to school full-time instead. I'm another one who gets bored after a startlingly short time, so I definitely understand that feeling.

Oh, and I specified my last day in the resignation letter (2 weeks notice at the first place, 6 weeks notice at the second) and then just went over it in person with everyone involved.
 

diamondfan

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Joined
Jun 17, 2005
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11,016
I think you just need to be honest and say that you just do not think this is the right position for you. You are not obligated to really go into details, but if asked, you could say you think your are not able to contribute to the workplace as you would like to and you need to be going in a different direction. You could allude gently to the fact that you are not being utilized by your superiors in a manner that is productive. I would try not to be too specific or point any fingers directly at anyone. I think it is nice to give notice so they can find a replacement but do not jeopardize your new gig. I think it is always best not to burn bridges, you never know what will come from having worked there, good or bad, so it is best to know that the way you handled your exit is above reproach. I think they would respect that you are trying to do your best, and if you have come to the decision that it is not a good fit, it is best to deal with it sooner rather than later. It sounds frustrating. I cannot imagine asking for more work and getting an annoyed response, she needs to get it together! To have an employee who is bright and capable offering to do more, heck, she should be thrilled and figure out how to delegate more to you.
 
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