Find your diamond
Find your jewelry
shape
carat
color
clarity

Haven or others with Traditional invites

Status
Not open for further replies. Please create a new topic or request for this thread to be opened.

meresal

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Nov 13, 2007
Messages
5,720
Sorry, peeps... I promise this will be the last invite question. I''m submitting my approval right now.

Haven, after reading your invite, I realized we are using the same template. On your RSVP, did you change the wording to spell "Favour of your reply", or leave it at "Favor of your reply"?

Anyone else, that is using this phrase, I would appreciate your input... Thnx.
 

CDNinNYC

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Oct 21, 2007
Messages
2,216
I don''t know if it''s an etiquette thing as much as a British vs. American language thing. I''d personally go with ''Favour'' but that''s how I was taught to spell it in Canada.

Hopefully someone can provide some better guidance than that!
 

dcgator

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Aug 15, 2008
Messages
1,115
I also used favour, if only for etiquette reasons. My invites are pretty traditional though. However, I think its up to you, so do whatever you like/looks better
 

CNOS128

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 28, 2008
Messages
2,700
I used "favour" (because the people at the invitation shop told me to!) and the two invitations I've gotten in the mail this week that are much more formal than mine also used "favour."
 

Sparkalicious

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Nov 22, 2007
Messages
3,721
As far as I understand it, "favour" is the proper etiquette or formal/traditional way to do it.
For this reason, my money is on Haven using favour, as opposed to, favor.

Meresal - How wonderful that you are at that point with your invites. Almost done!!
 

Guilty Pleasure

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
May 16, 2008
Messages
1,114
It is an English vs. American thing, and you should just make sure that you are consistent. If you use "honour of your presence" you should use "favour of a reply". If you choose "honor of your presence" then you should use "favor of a reply"


I used honour/favour.
 

meresal

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Nov 13, 2007
Messages
5,720
Honour and Favour was the final decision. Thanks everyone!!

Spark- Almost!! It hit the 4 month mark yesterday... it''s insane how fast this is flying by!
 

Haven

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Feb 15, 2007
Messages
13,166
Sparkalicious--You win!

Yes, we used "honour" and "favour." It is actually proper etiquette to use these spellings in the U.S. for formal invites, which is why we chose it.

Glad to hear you made your decision, Mere! I think they''re going to be absolutely beautiful.
 

dreaming of the day

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jun 12, 2008
Messages
480
I had very traditional invitations:

I used the British, more traditional, version:
honour of your...
favour of a reply...
two thousand and nine

The American version goes:
honor of your...
favor of a reply...
two thousand nine

I hope that helps.
 

Guilty Pleasure

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
May 16, 2008
Messages
1,114
Date: 3/26/2009 6:04:35 PM
Author: dreaming of the day
I had very traditional invitations:


I used the British, more traditional, version:

honour of your...

favour of a reply...

two thousand and nine


The American version goes:

honor of your...

favor of a reply...

two thousand nine


I hope that helps.

Is "two thousand and nine" really considered more formal than "two thousand nine"? I chose "two thousand nine" because it is grammatically correct, but I could still change it if it "matches" honour/favour. Where did you read that?
 

Haven

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Feb 15, 2007
Messages
13,166
Date: 3/26/2009 7:03:17 PM
Author: Guilty Pleasure
Is ''two thousand and nine'' really considered more formal than ''two thousand nine''? I chose ''two thousand nine'' because it is grammatically correct, but I could still change it if it ''matches'' honour/favour. Where did you read that?
I don''t know if it is more formal or if it matches the British wording more, but all of my etiquette guides had the "and" in there, if I recall correctly.
 

meresal

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Nov 13, 2007
Messages
5,720
Date: 3/26/2009 9:07:59 PM
Author: Haven

Date: 3/26/2009 7:03:17 PM
Author: Guilty Pleasure
Is ''two thousand and nine'' really considered more formal than ''two thousand nine''? I chose ''two thousand nine'' because it is grammatically correct, but I could still change it if it ''matches'' honour/favour. Where did you read that?
I don''t know if it is more formal or if it matches the British wording more, but all of my etiquette guides had the ''and'' in there, if I recall correctly.
Agreed. Every format I looked at, said "and nine"
 

dreaming of the day

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jun 12, 2008
Messages
480
Date: 3/26/2009 7:03:17 PM
Author: Guilty Pleasure

Date: 3/26/2009 6:04:35 PM
Author: dreaming of the day
I had very traditional invitations:


I used the British, more traditional, version:

honour of your...

favour of a reply...

two thousand and nine


The American version goes:

honor of your...

favor of a reply...

two thousand nine


I hope that helps.

Is ''two thousand and nine'' really considered more formal than ''two thousand nine''? I chose ''two thousand nine'' because it is grammatically correct, but I could still change it if it ''matches'' honour/favour. Where did you read that?
I honestly can''t remember where I read it, but I read it many times. I made sure to research the proper way on how to do invitations, as I really didn''t want to make a mistake. I am sure that it is correct.
 

Guilty Pleasure

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
May 16, 2008
Messages
1,114
I believe you! I just had read that it was a choice and not necessarily right or wrong either way, but most people choose two thousand AND nine. I was so concerned with finding the "right" way to do the invitation, which is why I asked for you to point in the right direction for a reference:)


It''s weird that I was so into doing the right thing, but now I''m like hmmm... maybe I don''t care on this one? As a Science teacher with 7 years of higher education under my belt, it kind of irks me that the mathematically incorrect phrasing is the proper way to do it


haha, oh well!

another question: Does the time have to be on a separate line from the year? I see that as the example, but does it have to be that way?
 

dreaming of the day

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jun 12, 2008
Messages
480
Date: 3/27/2009 1:08:47 AM
Author: Guilty Pleasure
I believe you! I just had read that it was a choice and not necessarily right or wrong either way, but most people choose two thousand AND nine. I was so concerned with finding the ''right'' way to do the invitation, which is why I asked for you to point in the right direction for a reference:)


It''s weird that I was so into doing the right thing, but now I''m like hmmm... maybe I don''t care on this one? As a Science teacher with 7 years of higher education under my belt, it kind of irks me that the mathematically incorrect phrasing is the proper way to do it


haha, oh well!

another question: Does the time have to be on a separate line from the year? I see that as the example, but does it have to be that way?
The time does have to be seperate as it should go:

Date: on Saturday, the twenty second of August
Year: two thousand and nine
Time: at three o''clock in the afternoon

Hope that helps!
 

Guilty Pleasure

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
May 16, 2008
Messages
1,114
dreaming, thanks for your response!


My invitation currently reads,

"Saturday, the eighteenth of July
Two thousand nine at five o''clock"


I could change it to,

"Saturday, the eighteenth of July
Two thousand and nine
at five o''clock"

but we''ll see. The designer put it into two lines, and I think it might just look better the way she has it since it''s less lines.
 

dreaming of the day

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jun 12, 2008
Messages
480
Date: 3/27/2009 3:03:12 PM
Author: Guilty Pleasure
dreaming, thanks for your response!


My invitation currently reads,

''Saturday, the eighteenth of July
Two thousand nine at five o''clock''


I could change it to,

''Saturday, the eighteenth of July
Two thousand and nine
at five o''clock''

but we''ll see. The designer put it into two lines, and I think it might just look better the way she has it since it''s less lines.
I would change it because it should read:

Saturday, the eighteenth of July
two thousand and nine
at five o''clock in the evening

Good Luck, and it is my pleasure to help you!
 
Status
Not open for further replies. Please create a new topic or request for this thread to be opened.
Be a part of the community It's free, join today!
    Push Present: Engagement Ring Upgrade
    Push Present: Engagement Ring Upgrade
    20th Anniversary Upgrade
    20th Anniversary Upgrade
    Horses for Courses: Polo Match Jewelry
    Horses for Courses: Polo Match Jewelry

Need Something Special?

Get a quote from multiple trusted and vetted jewelers.

Holloway Cut Advisor



Diamond Eye Candy

Click to view full-size image.
Top