Find your diamond
Find your jewelry
shape
carat
color
clarity

Going from one dog...to two?

Status
Not open for further replies. Please create a new topic or request for this thread to be opened.

E B

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Aug 31, 2005
Messages
9,488
As you can see in my icon, I have one dog: A spoiled little princess of a pug named Sally. She's two, and until now, I've felt that she's been plenty of dog for my fiance and me. What I haven't thought of is if she's enough dog for her.

Sally is my total cuddlebug and is on my lap every moment she can be. As I type, she's completely smashed against my leg, her head on my laptop. Since I've been in school, I've been able to stay home with her 4-5 days a week and on those days, we're inseparable.

I graduate from college in June, and I'll be starting my internship after that. After my internship, a job. After that, we'll most likely move to a different state and start a family. What I'm afraid of, through the changes, is that she won't be getting the attention she's been used to for the past 2 years. Of course, she'll still get plenty, but I'm worried she'll be lonely when we're away. I think a brother or sister to run around with would be wonderful, but adopting another little life always has me feeling anxious. Another little furball means more responsibility and higher vet bills, not to mention costs in general.

(We've already got Sally on a 100% coverage insurance plan, which we'd put the new dog on. Oh, and we wouldn't go the puppy route this time. We'd be rescuing a small breed around Sally's age.)

How was going from one dog to two (or more)? Are there more pros than cons? I'd love to hear details. I'd also love to hear opinions on my situation, from people who aren't directly in this emotional situation.

Thanks!

 

scarleta

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Feb 25, 2006
Messages
1,572
Your little Sally is beautifu indeed.I would personally not get any companion for her as yet.Just wait and see how she fits into your new routine.As she gets older she may surprise you and change a bit and may wish not to share her precious moments with another dog.It still be quality time with you only less of it and until you wait and see you really can''t be sure.Good luck to you..
 

AGBF

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jan 26, 2003
Messages
20,355
Date: 12/31/2006 9:19:22 PM
Author:EBree
How was going from one dog to two (or more)? Are there more pros than cons? I'd love to hear details. I'd also love to hear opinions on my situation, from people who aren't directly in this emotional situation.
I have never been in your situation. You sound incredibly responsible and conscientious to me. I like your reasoning and you have me convinced that you should adopt a playmate for Sally (and buy him insurance!). I have wound up leaving my dog (now 10) alone during the day for the first time this year and, although I am sure he sleeps a lot, I would feel guilty leaving a pet alone so much for much of his life!

Deb
 

diamondseeker2006

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jan 11, 2006
Messages
55,038
Well, dogs are pack animals, and they are very lonely if their "pack" is at work all day. We have two dogs for that reason. They are together at home when we are not, and they can stay together at the kennel when we travel. It certainly helps relieve my guilt over leaving them, and I do think they love each other! My other thought is that you''d really have to be careful adding an older dog to the situation. It''s a little different when they start out as puppies together. But hopefully you can find an easy-going dog who is also easy to train! I do think you should do it sooner than later, while Sally is still young and can adjust to a playmate. It may take time for them to accept each other, but it will be good in the long run if you make the right match. It may be better to get a male...or you may want to ask about that. I know two males aren''t a good idea and I''m not sure about 2 females. Someone should know the answer to that. We have a male and a female. I definitely think it is a good idea to have two if you plan to work fulltime.
 

Kaleigh

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Nov 18, 2004
Messages
29,570
We got our second dog because Casper seemed a little lonely. He had all the attention in the world but getting our second dog was the best thing we ever did. They are best friends and have such a blast together. He was thrilled when I brought her home. He knew something was up when I bought a second doggie bed. He understands the word doggie. I had told him another doggie was going to come home. I know that sounds weird but this dog has such an intelligence it's scary. Now when we leave we don't feel so badly as they have each other. I'm so glad you will get a rescue dog, next time I'm going that route as well. Casper is 14 now and Callie is 6. She's keeping him on his toes.
 

whatmeworry

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
May 23, 2006
Messages
1,095
When I got Dog#2 (the Bouvier), I made a conscientious effort to get a less dominant personality than Dog#1 (the German Shepherd). Dog #1 already had a pretty dominant personality so I wanted to avoid conflicts. Dog#2 was easier to train because she followed #1''s lead. They are both females and I''ve had no problems. I guess you have to be willing to cede the Alpha leader title away from Sally if that''s the way the pack sorts itself out. The only cons for me as you mentioned are the higher costs but if you set the rules of the house then there shouldn''t be any problems.
 

diamondseeker2006

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jan 11, 2006
Messages
55,038
I will have to tell you that we tried adopting two dogs from the shelter before getting our current two and it did not work out. They were very wild and could actually jump over our fence in the back yard! The final straw was when we came home from a weekend away and a neighbor had been caring for them. He put them in the garage the night before we came home because they had learned they could jump the fence while we were gone. But he didn''t know he was locking our outside cat in the garage in there with them. We came home to a disaster area in the garage and the poor, poor cat was dead. It was like some kind of Chevy Chase movie except it wasn''t funny. We returned them to the shelter (and they were later adopted individually).

One dog we have now is a male English bulldog, and the second was a puppy someone just gave our son. She actually is the best dog we''ve ever had. All this is to say, you can match up two dogs successfully, but consider your adoption a trial until you see if it works out, then try again if it doesn''t.
 

gail013

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Sep 21, 2006
Messages
335
I would consult with a professional involved in the animal adoption place you go thru, just to make sure the dogs are compatible. We adopted two puppies, both littermates and were advised it was a bad idea. But at that point I already had them home. They are great company for each other. If you have two dogs, you''ll want to be sure they have some obedience training, or they will bond more to each other than to you. I would think it is a good idea if you have the time to walk them, and give them exercise of some kind.
 

strmrdr

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Nov 1, 2003
Messages
23,295
invite a dog over for a play date and see how it goes if after the third time she acts like she misses her friend get another dog soon.

do not wait until your time is shorter then add a dog.
that can lead to resentment.
 

bee*

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
May 14, 2006
Messages
12,170
I agree with the other comments. Although you dont want to get another puppy, make sure that any adult dog that you get will not dominate Sally. We have three dogs and have gotten them all at different stages and dog number 1 has always been boss. Dog number 2 has tried to take over a couple of times. Just make sure that they are compatible. Normally when you get a puppy, the puppy is very submissive to the other dog but an adult dog might not be.
Our three dogs love each other and hate to be apart. They still give us, their owners, huge amounts of attention but they still love each other so much. They fly around the garden chasing each other and curl up at night sleeping.
 

justjulia

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Apr 4, 2006
Messages
2,308
We have tried twice to bring shelter dogs in to our family and it did not work out. For whatever reasons, there have been alpha issues and the new dogs wanted to be the boss--just did not work. All of our dogs from then on came in as puppies and this has worked very well. I''m not saying it never works, it just did not work for us. Our dogs love love love each other. They groom each other and sleep together and generally move together as a group (we have 5) (1 lab and 4 chihuahuas). We added each as a puppy. My best friend has 2 pugs- acquired the first as a pup, then added the other a yr later as another pup. She crates them during the day or they are outside during warm months in a fenced yard- and they are adorable.

I definitely think 2 is good. With my 5 I even leave the tv on when I''m at work. I hate the idea of anyone being lonely.
 

diamondfan

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jun 17, 2005
Messages
11,016
Everyone I know who has done it has said it was great, especially if they work or were gone from home a lot.

I think the dog is happier, less destructive behaviors can occur because the dog is not as bored or anxious.

Resuing a dog is such a nice option, and I am not sure if you should get another female or what, your dog would be the dominant one...so I am not sure how it would work and what would be best, likely another female...
 

stretch4

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jul 25, 2004
Messages
4,360
My mother had a dog when she met and later married my step-father. He too had a dog, and they became the best of friends. My mother''s dog was a terror before he befriended the other dog!


What I would do is talk to the shelter and have them suggest a couple dogs that fit the description of what you are looking for. Then set up a visit where you can bring your dog to meet them. Hopefully that way you will find your dog''s best match!

Good luck!
 

E B

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Aug 31, 2005
Messages
9,488
Thanks for the good advice, everyone! I truly appreciate it, and I'd love to hear more.

As of now, we're seriously considering it. What we need to think about, more than anything, is the right time to adopt. I graduate in less than 6 months and we're not sure if we should adopt sooner rather than later, when my schedule is more flexible (only 3 days a week of school).

Regarding male or female, I'm going to do a lot of research before deciding. My mother has two female dogs who love each other, but one was introduced to the other as a puppy. Sally's quite the little alpha female, so I'm going to let the rescue coordinator know that we'll need one that's more submissive. To tell the truth, I'm leaning towards another female due to males being markers, but I don't think I'd mind too much: cleaning isn't a big deal. I guess I just need to do more research before making any serious decisions.

Again, thank you all so much, and keep the stories coming!
 
Status
Not open for further replies. Please create a new topic or request for this thread to be opened.
Be a part of the community It's free, join today!

Need Something Special?

Get a quote from multiple trusted and vetted jewelers.

Holloway Cut Advisor



Diamond Eye Candy

Click to view full-size image.

New posts

Top