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Are Expensive Hairdryers Worth It?

Jambalaya

Ideal_Rock
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Oct 2, 2014
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I want better-looking hair. I'm fed up with my hair looking so crap all the time, even with getting good cuts. It's fine yet really frizzy. Total poufball and very hard to control, and somehow manages to be both frizzy and flat at once - flat fine roots for the first four inches and the rest of it frizzy. The second day it looks somewhat OK but by the third day my home blowdry drops out completely. It never looks as good as the day I dry it. I'm after a big bouncy blowdry, smooth but wavy (my hair will never be straight - if I scrunch it with mousse, it's wildly curly.)

So I was looking up about blowdrying, and it's very confusing - some experts say to mostly rough-dry and then finish with the dryer, and some say to dry it from very wet.

I should get the right tools, so I was looking up about blowdryers. Some are $300. Are they worth it? Also, ionic or non-ionic? Apparently ionic is good for frizz but not for volume, and I need the volume, being both both flat and frizzy. Drybar has a buttercup-yellow dryer that is supposedly good for volume, but it's ionic so how can it be? I'm confused.

I also read that you need a real bristle brush. Turns out my Conair tourmaline brush has real bristles so I'm OK there I think, but if anyone knows a good round brush, please tell me.

Tell me any secrets you have for taming unmanageable hair! Thanks!
 

telephone89

Ideal_Rock
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Are they worth it? Yes, to a point. IMO you don't need ions or whatever - I've never found they make any difference. What you need is airflow, and heat (if you use it). Airflow is the most important. Higher wattage means more powerful airflow. I personally don't use much heat, so when I blowdry I use it on low/cold. If you like heat, having adjustable settings is good. Most do now a days anyways.

The brush and the technique is also very important. How long is your hair? Do you have a round brush or a paddle brush? A round brush will give you the volume, and used correctly will help smooth the cuticle as well.
 

liaerfbv

Brilliant_Rock
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My hair is naturally very wavy and extremely frizzy. I started using Biosilk serum a few years ago (literally just a drop) when I got out of the shower and it made a world of difference. I've never found a hairdryer I thought was worth the money and I've tried several - Chi, Babyliss, etc.
 
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tweeter8177

Brilliant_Rock
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Feb 18, 2013
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I don't know if the higher price hair dryers are worth it, but I am interested in hearing everyone's thoughts too! I have been in the market for a new one since mine is pretty old. I have a Solano currently (don't know the model) and it has lasted several years. I am scared it is going to die on me. In all my research the Solano is still at the top of my list (offered by Ulta). It is ionic, tourmaline and ceramic so seems the best of all worlds. I have very fine hair that frizzes easy. I need to start using a heat protectant product, which might help. Also, make sure you aren't using the hot setting when drying your hair as that will cause more frizz on fine hair. It seems like the Babybliss gets really good reviews and some of them are a little more reasonable (still not cheap though).

I am now looking for a new curling iron. I just have a $10 Conair. I had know idea you could spend $200 on one!!!! :o
 

yssie

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[URL='https://www.pricescope.com/community/threads/why-i-love-my-luxury-hairdryer.200662/']https://www.pricescope.com/community/threads/why-i-love-my-luxury-hairdryer.200662/[/URL]
::)

I have a GHD Air for home use and two Baby Bliss' (one full-size, one mini) for travel.
I LOVE my GHD. My hair is super-fine and prone to thinning/breaking, and it's also quite long (reaches the small of my back). The GHD gets the entire lot ready to curl with a hot iron in ten minutes, ready to walk out of the house without further styling in five, *without* frying it! The temperature is low enough that you can use a natural fiber/bristle hairbrush without worrying about bristles melting (you can blow your skin and it'll be uncomfortable but it won't burn)... Which was my top priority since my hair is so prone to breakage already. Love that the stream of air is powerful enough to dry quickly without overheating - it's great for drying diamonds after washing, too ::)

The full size Baby Bliss is dual-voltage, which is really nice for travelling. I don't use it regularly at home because the "hot" is hotter than the GHD - this one does hurt if you blow your skin for longer than a few seconds. Still a powerful stream though, and it's fine on "warm" (which is a bit cooler than I want) :))

Totally agree with telephone re. the hairbrush making all the difference! I tried probably ten-fifteen before caving and buying a Mason Pearson (Sensitive), and I haven't looked back. All-natural boar bristles mean no static, the "base" is air-filled so you won't damage your hair/scalp by pressing too hard, and the bristles themselves really do do a phenomenal job of distributing natural (and unnatural :bigsmile:) oils and removing yesterday's hairspray with a few strokes. It's a PITA to clean though. I wash my hair every other day (after working out) and my hair is the healthiest it's been in years, probably, with no other changes to my routine.
 

yssie

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tweeter8177|1458518083|4008623 said:
I am now looking for a new curling iron. I just have a $10 Conair. I had know idea you could spend $200 on one!!!! :o
Tweeter!! :wavey:

Not sure if you're looking for a rec? But if so... Do we have similar hair? Mine is fine, thin, long enough to be heavy, and I think nothing short of superglue would keep it curled for a full fifteen-hour day :bigsmile: For the eight hours or so I can reasonably expect a curler to keep it curled, though, I've had really good luck with the Sedu Revolution line! They run ~$100 each, so quite a bit cheaper than other options :sun: the ceramic barrels heat fast and cool quickly, and they do get *super* hot - hotter than you'd want, probably! It's the smooth barrel sans clip type, which IMO makes a lot more sense - you don't want to clip already-damaged ends and let them fry whilst twisting the barrel up to the base anyway! The cord is actually long enough to not worry about where the nearest enpoint is, and the barrel is completely, totally smooth so washing product off is really easy, and having dropped it more than a couple of times... the ceramic is pretty sturdy. It doesn't seem to damage my hair nearly as much as a couple of other ceramic irons I've tried, which for me is top priority... the only downside is that the barrel is pretty short, so I have to be careful to wrap the strands tightly or I'll run out of space. Not a huge deal but it does take a bit of adjustment ::)
 

VRBeauty

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I have genetically pretty straight hair. I got a tourmaline ionic dryer several years ago and yes, it does make a difference in reducing fly-aways and keeping my hair smoother. I let a friend who has naturally curly-verging-on-kinky hair try it and she was sold instantly. I can still use a brush or my fingers to add fullness, but my hair looks a lot neater with less fly-aways and frizzy ends. It also dries my hair faster. So - I will stick with tourmaline ion technology. After that I look for 1) low noise, and 2) a dryer that works ergonomically with my hand. The dryer I'm using now cost about $100 maybe 6 or so years ago. My friend got her ionic dryer for about $40.
 

momhappy

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Yes, I think expensive hair dryers are worth it. The two main characteristics of any hair dryer are heat (cool, warm, hot settings) and control (varying speeds of air flow - like low, medium, high). Different hair types can dry better/faster with different heat and/or control settings. Many cheap hair dryers operate with high heat and low power, which can mean more damage/frizz because it takes longer to dry your hair. Ionic dryers can be beneficial for certain hair types (they can help to dry hair faster while still holding on to moisture resulting in hair that's more smooth/soft), so that's something to consider. You can find a good quality dryer in the $100 price range and it's something that should last you for years to come.
 

chrono

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I thought hair dryers are not good for the hair? I don't use it (air dry) and have no issues with damage, dryness, static, etc. During winter, I will apply a little olive oil or argan oil as needed.
 
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momhappy

Ideal_Rock
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^Sure, heat styling (in general) is not necessarily "good" for the hair, but many people still do it. Personally, my hair is easier to deal with if I blow dry vs. air dry (air drying leaves it pretty flat and lifeless). Decent quality hair dryers and hair products (like ones with heat protection) can help to minimize heat damage, so it's not much of a concern for me.
 

tweeter8177

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Yssie|1458521388|4008644 said:
tweeter8177|1458518083|4008623 said:
I am now looking for a new curling iron. I just have a $10 Conair. I had know idea you could spend $200 on one!!!! :o
Tweeter!! :wavey:

Not sure if you're looking for a rec? But if so... Do we have similar hair? Mine is fine, thin, long enough to be heavy, and I think nothing short of superglue would keep it curled for a full fifteen-hour day :bigsmile: For the eight hours or so I can reasonably expect a curler to keep it curled, though, I've had really good luck with the Sedu Revolution line! They run ~$100 each, so quite a bit cheaper than other options :sun: the ceramic barrels heat fast and cool quickly, and they do get *super* hot - hotter than you'd want, probably! It's the smooth barrel sans clip type, which IMO makes a lot more sense - you don't want to clip already-damaged ends and let them fry whilst twisting the barrel up to the base anyway! The cord is actually long enough to not worry about where the nearest enpoint is, and the barrel is completely, totally smooth so washing product off is really easy, and having dropped it more than a couple of times... the ceramic is pretty sturdy. It doesn't seem to damage my hair nearly as much as a couple of other ceramic irons I've tried, which for me is top priority... the only downside is that the barrel is pretty short, so I have to be careful to wrap the strands tightly or I'll run out of space. Not a huge deal but it does take a bit of adjustment ::)
Thanks Yssie!! :wavey:

I get obsessive with researching this stuff so I ran across the Sedu Revolution curling irons. They get rave reviews pretty much every where! My struggle is converting to a clipless iron! I have visions of me spending hours trying to curl my hair with burn marks every where and still ending up with flat hair!! I am not coordinated! :wall: Maybe I should buy a cheapy one to start to see if I am capable of using it. :lol: If Sedu made a clip version I would be all over it!!! Thanks for the recommendation!!! It sounds like I should at minimum look at ceramic irons vs. gold plated.
 

telephone89

Ideal_Rock
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Chrono|1458565548|4008865 said:
I thought hair dryers are not good for the hair? I don't use it (air dry) and have no issues with damage, dryness, static, etc. During winter, I will apply a little olive oil or argan oil as needed.
Blow drying itself isn't harmful, it's the heat that is. Heat damage is also cumulative, so you can't tell right away (unlike say, bleaching) and will weaken the hair over a period of time.
 

star sparkle

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I asked myself the same question, and I did a lot of research when my old crappy hairdryer finally died. I wanted a super nice one, but I balked at the $150+ prices I was finding.

I ended up going with this Rusk hairdryer, and it's seriously the best thing ever. It was a bit more expensive when I got it (around $70), so I think it's currently a STEAL. I love it so much, it's exponentially better than my old cheap hairdryer and really isn't *that* expensive when it comes to expensive hair dryers. I really can't recommend it highly enough.
 

simurgh

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tweeter8177|1458571764|4008901 said:
Yssie|1458521388|4008644 said:
tweeter8177|1458518083|4008623 said:
I am now looking for a new curling iron. I just have a $10 Conair. I had know idea you could spend $200 on one!!!! :o
Tweeter!! :wavey:

Not sure if you're looking for a rec? But if so... Do we have similar hair? Mine is fine, thin, long enough to be heavy, and I think nothing short of superglue would keep it curled for a full fifteen-hour day :bigsmile: For the eight hours or so I can reasonably expect a curler to keep it curled, though, I've had really good luck with the Sedu Revolution line! They run ~$100 each, so quite a bit cheaper than other options :sun: the ceramic barrels heat fast and cool quickly, and they do get *super* hot - hotter than you'd want, probably! It's the smooth barrel sans clip type, which IMO makes a lot more sense - you don't want to clip already-damaged ends and let them fry whilst twisting the barrel up to the base anyway! The cord is actually long enough to not worry about where the nearest enpoint is, and the barrel is completely, totally smooth so washing product off is really easy, and having dropped it more than a couple of times... the ceramic is pretty sturdy. It doesn't seem to damage my hair nearly as much as a couple of other ceramic irons I've tried, which for me is top priority... the only downside is that the barrel is pretty short, so I have to be careful to wrap the strands tightly or I'll run out of space. Not a huge deal but it does take a bit of adjustment ::)
Thanks Yssie!! :wavey:

I get obsessive with researching this stuff so I ran across the Sedu Revolution curling irons. They get rave reviews pretty much every where! My struggle is converting to a clipless iron! I have visions of me spending hours trying to curl my hair with burn marks every where and still ending up with flat hair!! I am not coordinated! :wall: Maybe I should buy a cheapy one to start to see if I am capable of using it. :lol: If Sedu made a clip version I would be all over it!!! Thanks for the recommendation!!! It sounds like I should at minimum look at ceramic irons vs. gold plated.
Hot tools makes a gold and black one with a clip fit about $40 that is awesome - you could start there?
 

tweeter8177

Brilliant_Rock
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simurgh|1458791036|4010215 said:
tweeter8177|1458571764|4008901 said:
Yssie|1458521388|4008644 said:
tweeter8177|1458518083|4008623 said:
I am now looking for a new curling iron. I just have a $10 Conair. I had know idea you could spend $200 on one!!!! :o
Tweeter!! :wavey:

Not sure if you're looking for a rec? But if so... Do we have similar hair? Mine is fine, thin, long enough to be heavy, and I think nothing short of superglue would keep it curled for a full fifteen-hour day :bigsmile: For the eight hours or so I can reasonably expect a curler to keep it curled, though, I've had really good luck with the Sedu Revolution line! They run ~$100 each, so quite a bit cheaper than other options :sun: the ceramic barrels heat fast and cool quickly, and they do get *super* hot - hotter than you'd want, probably! It's the smooth barrel sans clip type, which IMO makes a lot more sense - you don't want to clip already-damaged ends and let them fry whilst twisting the barrel up to the base anyway! The cord is actually long enough to not worry about where the nearest enpoint is, and the barrel is completely, totally smooth so washing product off is really easy, and having dropped it more than a couple of times... the ceramic is pretty sturdy. It doesn't seem to damage my hair nearly as much as a couple of other ceramic irons I've tried, which for me is top priority... the only downside is that the barrel is pretty short, so I have to be careful to wrap the strands tightly or I'll run out of space. Not a huge deal but it does take a bit of adjustment ::)
Thanks Yssie!! :wavey:

I get obsessive with researching this stuff so I ran across the Sedu Revolution curling irons. They get rave reviews pretty much every where! My struggle is converting to a clipless iron! I have visions of me spending hours trying to curl my hair with burn marks every where and still ending up with flat hair!! I am not coordinated! :wall: Maybe I should buy a cheapy one to start to see if I am capable of using it. :lol: If Sedu made a clip version I would be all over it!!! Thanks for the recommendation!!! It sounds like I should at minimum look at ceramic irons vs. gold plated.
Hot tools makes a gold and black one with a clip fit about $40 that is awesome - you could start there?
Do you mean that it has the option of being a clip or clipless? That would be great! Thanks! I am going to try to get to Ulta in the next few days to check them out. I realized that I could use my normal curling iron and just not use the clip to try clipless curling. I found it VERY hard to curl my right side properly because I couldn't hold the iron with my left had. I am right handed and it was awkward. I found that I got way more volume up on the top of my head (yeah!), but not much curl in the mid-section area. I guess it does take practice!!
 

Jambalaya

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Thanks so much for the replies everyone - I really appreciate it. Uncle is staying for a couple of weeks (he's ninety) so I'm just dipping in and out briefly as I'm so busy, but will be able to read it properly in mid-April. Thanks again!
 

the_mother_thing

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I also have very fine hair with a natural wavy curl, and it frizzes like a finger in electric socket if I don't coach it with a few things. Here is my usual routine if it helps you at all, including my hairdryer. ;-)

I do not use shampoos/conditioners containing sulfates. After wash/condition, I towel dry my hair, then apply 5 sprays of "It's a 10" with keratin leave-in conditioner all over. Then I use a about a dime amount of Tigi blow out balm (emulsify in hands and apply all over), and lastly a light mist of ion heat protection spray all over. Comb through, then blow dry it (without the concentrator) half way to dry, focusing on the roots for volume. Then I section it out, starting on the lower half (put top into a clip), and blow it out with the concentrator and a round brush. I work my way around the head, then let a layer from the top down, and repeat until it's all done. Start to finish usually takes me 15 mins tops. Doing that, I can add sleek curls or a sleek straight style depending on how I roll the brush or not when blowing it out.

My hairdryer is the Rusk Speed Freak. I think I paid $120 for it when I bought it 5 or so years ago, and it's now about half that price. It has been worth every penny because the concentrator is awesome on it. When I bought it, I was all about the concentrator because it really helps to focus the heat and air on the part of my hair I am styling, and it really is fast!

Hope that helps! :wavey:
 

UrsTx

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I have chin length, oily, fine, wavy/frizzy hair, when air dried. I wash my hair daily with (many will disagree with me but it works for me better than many expensive shampoos and conditioners) 2-in-1 Finesse shampoo + conditioner. Why? The conditioner in it is super light so the flyaway is under control and my hair is not "weighed down" by a heavy conditioner thus giving it more body

I squeeze dry the water from my hair after my shower. I put on makeup while my hair air dries a little. Then I spray Bumble and Bumble Prep and follow with their Thickening Spray. Prep puts vitamins in my hair since I blow dry it daily. Thickening Spray is like a leave in-conditioner. My hair is super flat if I omit one of those items.

Then I use my cheap $30 hairdryer from Conair. It's tourmaline and ionic. And if it dies in 1-2 yrs, I can afford a new one. http://www.walmart.com/ip/Conair-Professional-Tourmaline-Ionic-Hair-Dryer-1ct/6371264?action=product_interest&action_type=title&item_id=6371264&placement_id=irs-106-t1&strategy=PWVUB&visitor_id&category=&client_guid=b66a8148-79bb-4cb3-89d0-7bee85edd07b&customer_id_enc&config_id=106&parent_item_id=33284064&parent_anchor_item_id=33284064&guid=fc81594c-b1f4-41d7-8c4f-cae1a9cb0d03&bucket_id=irsbucket003&beacon_version=1.0.1&findingMethod=p13n

I use the diffuser on hot until my hair is 70% dry. Then I put on the concentrator attachment, pin my hair in sections, and use my Olivia Garden ceramic ion round brush for the blowout, again on hot temp - remember to keep the hairdryer moving, it does not sit still on any one section. My short hair makes this an easy process. 6 minutes total from beginning to end. Have not had a spilt end in 12 years.

http://www.amazon.com/Olivia-Garden-Thermic-Ceramic-Brush/dp/B003IX36H0/ref=sr_1_3_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1459125253&sr=8-3&keywords=olivia+garden+brushes
 

House Cat

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I think it is more than an expensive hair dryer that does the trick. It is an equation of good products, good tools, and good technique.

For the look that you are describing that you want, you will need products that create soft body. Don't use anything that becomes stiff when it dries like gel or sprays that harden. Instead, find a very nice styling cream. Also, get a hairspray that sprays a very fine mist like elnett by loreal. It would be a good idea to get a lesson from a good stylist on how to create lasting body in your hair. She/he should have no problem with teaching you how to style your hair. From what you describe of your hair, I would go at it wet because of the shorter length. If you dry it to damp, by the time you get to the last bits, they will be too dry and frizzy to do anything with them. If you keep it all on the wetter side, nothing will get frizzy.

YouTube is your friend!!! I learn so much about beauty techniques from YouTube.

But really, a good stylist is going to be the most help.
 

msop04

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House Cat|1459173365|4012001 said:
I think it is more than an expensive hair dryer that does the trick. It is an equation of good products, good tools, and good technique.

For the look that you are describing that you want, you will need products that create soft body. Don't use anything that becomes stiff when it dries like gel or sprays that harden. Instead, find a very nice styling cream. Also, get a hairspray that sprays a very fine mist like elnett by loreal. It would be a good idea to get a lesson from a good stylist on how to create lasting body in your hair. She/he should have no problem with teaching you how to style your hair. From what you describe of your hair, I would go at it wet because of the shorter length. If you dry it to damp, by the time you get to the last bits, they will be too dry and frizzy to do anything with them. If you keep it all on the wetter side, nothing will get frizzy.

YouTube is your friend!!! I learn so much about beauty techniques from YouTube.

But really, a good stylist is going to be the most help.
I agree with House Cat... Although I will say that I bought an expensive hair dryer from my salon for almost $200 and it's been great for nearly 12 years! (I may have just jinxed myself) :lol: :lol:
 

BeekeeperBetty

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If your hair is frizzy, it sounds like it needs more moisture and some hold.

Hair dryers are usually a bad idea for naturally curly hair. I look like I've stuck my finger in a light socket if I use a hair dryer. Even just going out on a windy day ruins my hair.

Since it sounds like you want straighter hair, have you gotten a keratin treatment? Or tried getting your chemically hair straightened? Some of them have all kinds of fancy names, brazilian, japanese, etc. I've done most of them. It's just chemically straightening your hair, fancy name aside.
 

Yimmers

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Jambalaya|1458492765|4008377 said:
I want better-looking hair. I'm fed up with my hair looking so crap all the time, even with getting good cuts. It's fine yet really frizzy. Total poufball and very hard to control, and somehow manages to be both frizzy and flat at once - flat fine roots for the first four inches and the rest of it frizzy. The second day it looks somewhat OK but by the third day my home blowdry drops out completely. It never looks as good as the day I dry it. I'm after a big bouncy blowdry, smooth but wavy (my hair will never be straight - if I scrunch it with mousse, it's wildly curly.)

So I was looking up about blowdrying, and it's very confusing - some experts say to mostly rough-dry and then finish with the dryer, and some say to dry it from very wet.

I should get the right tools, so I was looking up about blowdryers. Some are $300. Are they worth it? Also, ionic or non-ionic? Apparently ionic is good for frizz but not for volume, and I need the volume, being both both flat and frizzy. Drybar has a buttercup-yellow dryer that is supposedly good for volume, but it's ionic so how can it be? I'm confused.

I also read that you need a real bristle brush. Turns out my Conair tourmaline brush has real bristles so I'm OK there I think, but if anyone knows a good round brush, please tell me.

Tell me any secrets you have for taming unmanageable hair! Thanks!
My hairstylist specializes in curly hair. She's trained in the "deva curl" technique. Basically, curly hair is cut dry then shampooed and styled.
She'd probably tell you yes, the expensive hairdryers are worth it. If you don't use a diffuser if you are trying to dry for natural curls, then it's an absolute must to avoid frizzy hair. I don't have curly hair, but the haircuts she gives to curly hair gals are great. And she's a curly lock girl herself.

I never figured this one at as well until the past year. Dry your hair with the hairdryer pointed down the shaft. It smooths the shaft down, creating the shine and avoiding the frizz.

I have a Sedu clipless iron. I love it. I never managed to do well with the clip irons. I want to get the T3 convertible, but it's literally $270. So I'll have to wait for a coupon from Sephora.
 

GlamMosher

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From a curly girl, the most important thing I have learned with how to get a nice curl (it makes me sad that curlies straighten their hair! Embrace your curls!) is to comb my hair before I wash it and get all the loose ones/clumps and knots ones. Then wash and thread your fingers through again with conditioner to get the rest of the loose hairs out.

Then DON"T COMB OR BRUSH IT AGAIN!!! Dry it with a difuser and don't even touch it with your fingers. Just let the diffuser do the work, don't even move it around too much, as in flicking it around. Just gently move it from place to place. Let the last bit air dry.

Again, don't comb or brush it unless you want to ruin your curl pattern. Once it is fully dry, you can loosen the curls gently with your fingers but don't comb it!

You obviously need to find the best products for your hair too, as House cat said don't get ones that makes your hair "crunchy". I only wash my hair once a week as curly hair is notoriously dry.
 

the_mother_thing

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Update: I just purchased this past week a TigiPro SessionTools blow dryer (link: https://www.amazon.com/TiGi-Pro-Dryer-Session-Tools/dp/B00HNZCWNI), though I purchased through my salon because they offered me 25% off on all tools. I still have my Rusk Speed Freak blower, but my daughter keeps snagging it, and I was tired of going to hunt it down in her room.

My stylist uses this one, so I checked it out during my last appointment. I loved the switch-style & location of the buttons (where I don't bump them while styling my hair) and the features, specifically the option to once-click the cold shot button and have it stay ON cold shot until you re-click the button to come off cold shot and return to the heat (vs having to hold the cold shot button down like most blowers) . I also really like the concentrator, which is a bit longer in length than my Rusk one, allowing me to apply heat to more hair on the brush when blowing it out than I was with the Rusk concentrator, but it's still fairly narrow/thin compared to others I've seen which I like (some of them are so wide that it doesn't really concentrate the air flow much at all. From a weight perspective, I think it's just a smidge lighter in weight from my Rusk. The cord is also a good length.

Lastly - it WORKS ... and what I mean by that is (aside from obviously blowing hot/cool air) by using the negative ion feature (vs. positive, which is also an option on this model), I felt a SUBSTANTIAL difference for the better in my hair when I was done styling it myself, at home, with my usual products. It felt lighter, had more volume, and the texture just felt better ... like I just walked out of a salon blow-out.

Pricey? $ure.

Worth it? IMO, you betcha!

ETA: I have thin hair, lots of it, and it's usually a bit frizzy if I don't use the right products and blow it out. I will add that I recently started using a MoroccanOil Hydrate styling creme product that I have found REALLY stands up to our southern humid summers in NC.
 

Jambalaya

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Oct 2, 2014
Messages
3,548
Update: I just bought the Drybar Buttercup dryer and the answer to the question "Are Expensive Hairdryers Worth It?" is yes, yes, yes!

Yes! Yes! Yes!

Omg, you would not believe the difference between this and my $20 Conair one. It's like going from driving an old rustbucket to a Mercedes.

It doesn't get anything like as hot as my Conair, even on the highest setting. I didn't realize how much I was scorching my hair. Even with lower heat, it dries my hair quickly and my hair looked smoother than it's ever been - probably because the dryer is ionic. I didn't have much luck with the ionic dryer at my gym but this is totally different.

It's also light and quiet and has a long cord. My hair has never looked better and I just can't believe how gentle yet effective the heat is. My Conair was searing the crap out of my hair and I never realised it.

Also, the cool shot button is truly cold.

Bonus, I got the limited edition gift set, and instead of it being bright yellow, it sparkles like a glitterball! In the kit, there is hair glitter spray, and I inwardly rolled my eyes thinking "I'm not 16." BUT! It's great - the glitter spray gives you the teeniest, tiniest pinpricks of light in your hair.

Sorry for the link below - the photo of the set is too small to pull and post. Anyway, it's $215 for a $285 value and you get the glittery limited-edition dryer instead of the yellow one!

Bonus pic of a 14k yellow gold knot ring that I just got on sale from Bluenile, and I love it.

https://www.thedrybar.com/glitter-gang-blowdryer-kit 14 (1).JPG 14 (2).JPG 15.JPG 16.JPG
 

Jambalaya

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Oct 2, 2014
Messages
3,548
ETA: Just realized that this is the perfect dryer for a Pricescoper, because it's sparkly!
 

whitewave

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Feb 29, 2012
Messages
9,636
I have a GHD and a harry Josh and I prefer the HJ one. But I have two houses and an RV plus a daughter and she has a dorm, plus I like to keep one in the guest bathroom so.... I am wanting to get a Dyson or another Harry Josh.0
 

Jambalaya

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Oct 2, 2014
Messages
3,548
Oh, I always wondered about the HJ one. Did you know he's brought out an updated version called Harry Josh Ultralight for $340?

What's your opinion of your HJ dryer? I saw that the buttons are on the outside of the dryer so I was concerned that my hand would keep pressing them.

The Dyson one looks amazing, but I don't think it could make me happier than my glittery Drybar!
 

madelise

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Sep 23, 2011
Messages
5,294
I got the Dyson and it is SO worth it! Much quieter and more efficient. It’s also lighter so my arms don’t get as tired.
 

lissyflo

Brilliant_Rock
Premium
Joined
May 23, 2016
Messages
910
You’d hair sounds the same as mine, Jambalaya - fine and frizzy. I LOVE the BaByliss Big Hair and think I’d have palpitations if I had to go without it. It’s not a hairdryer - you use it on hair that’s 70 to 80% dry and it finishes drying and styles at the same time. It takes a while to get the hang of it but it adds volume and totally controls my frizz. It only lasts the day I dry my hair for me (my hair’s too fine to hold a style overnight) but at least my hair looks decent every other day, when I wash it! And it saves hours of arm ache trying to use a bristle brush with one hand and holding the drier with the other!
 
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