Tension Engagement Rings

Setting Your Diamond

The setting style of a ring refers to how the stones are secured. Setting styles for center stones include prong set, bezel set, tension set and burnished set.

Tension Set Rings

Tension settings are known for their beautiful profiles, and they are often found in sleek and contemporary designs. The center stone is held in place by grooves that are carved into each side of the metal, securing the stone at the girdle. The metal of the ring is processed to harden and strengthen it, so the stone stays in place. More metal is typically used in a tension setting, because the heavier the piece, the stronger the tension. Like half bezel settings, some of the diamond is exposed, but well made tension settings are very sturdy and secure.

Click on the links below for examples of Tension Settings and Burnished Set Rings shared by Pricescope community members.

Tension Settings

Burnished Settings

Tension Set Rings



Diamond Engagement Ring Tension Setting
Tension Set Rings - Left to Right
1.34ct Octavia Asscher, .82ct ACA, 2.26ct Asscher Cut, .83ct Solasfera
Posted by kenny



Diamond  Engagement Ring Tension Setting
1.0ct Steven Kretchmer Tension Set Engagement Ring
Posted by MikeRato1



Diamond Solitaire Engagement Ring
2.0ct Niessing Tension Set Engagement Ring
Posted by Vote4PedroToo



Tension Set Diamond Engagement Ring
Tension Set Engagement Ring
Posted by Rock Pile



Tension Set Diamond Engagement Ring
.63ct Diamond in Gelin Abaci Tension Setting
Posted by kboggs315



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Burnished Set Rings (Flush Set)

A burnished setting is sleek and comfortable, because the diamond lies flush with the surrounding metal. A “seat” is drilled into the metal and the diamond is placed inside. The metal is then pushed over the edge of the stone holding it in place.



Burnished Set Diamond Engagement Ring
.83ct Diamond Burnished Set Engagement Ring
Posted by Rhombus



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Basic Mounting Styles: Knife Edge, Cathedral, Pavé Set, Channel Set, and Split Shank Rings »