Find your diamond
Find your jewelry
shape
carat
color
clarity

Who has a very small dog? Experiences?

Status
Not open for further replies. Please create a new topic or request for this thread to be opened.

LamborghiniGirl

Shiny_Rock
Trade
Joined
Mar 9, 2009
Messages
419
I am curious who on Pricescope has a very small dog (i.e. less than 7 pounds)

I am dying to get a puppy soon, hopefully this summer or maybe in the fall.

I had a Maltese puppy for about 1 month last year, and it was a disaster-- the breeder lied about his clean bill of health, and when I took him to my vet for his first visit, he had fleas, multiple worms, and a genetic disorder that made him cough constantly (technically a collapsed trachea-- something the breeder had to have known of because one of the parents had to have had it.) So, I had to return him, because since I was moving South, the vet said the warm climate and humidity would only make it worse.

So,

Has anyone had a great experience with a very small dog? Maybe even a Maltese? I know very small dogs are more likely to have medical problems, but has anyone had a good experience with a healthy tiny dog? I''d love to find a dog that will grow to only be about 5 or 6 pounds, but the last thing I want is an unhealthy baby!!!
 

Brown.Eyed.Girl

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jun 4, 2008
Messages
6,893
Date: 4/15/2009 12:02:57 AM
Author:LamborghiniGirl
I am curious who on Pricescope has a very small dog (i.e. less than 7 pounds)


I am dying to get a puppy soon, hopefully this summer or maybe in the fall.


I had a Maltese puppy for about 1 month last year, and it was a disaster-- the breeder lied about his clean bill of health, and when I took him to my vet for his first visit, he had fleas, multiple worms, and a genetic disorder that made him cough constantly (technically a collapsed trachea-- something the breeder had to have known of because one of the parents had to have had it.) So, I had to return him, because since I was moving South, the vet said the warm climate and humidity would only make it worse.


So,


Has anyone had a great experience with a very small dog? Maybe even a Maltese? I know very small dogs are more likely to have medical problems, but has anyone had a good experience with a healthy tiny dog? I''d love to find a dog that will grow to only be about 5 or 6 pounds, but the last thing I want is an unhealthy baby!!!
Hey LG, my family''s Chihuahua clocks in a little bigger than what you''re asking for, but I thought I''d chime in. We bought Cocoa 12 years ago as a puppy from backyard breeders. He was about 7 pounds as a fully grown adult - now he''s a lazy old boy so he''s about 8.5 lbs (little fatty
). He''s been remarkably healthy all his life. In retrospect, I''m incredibly thankful he has been since we knew basically nothing going into the dog-buying process and they were backyard breeders (and we paid $200 for him). The only health thing is that we had to have him neutered when he was about 3 because we found some bumps on him - nothing big but the vet recommended neuter just in case. His personality has been wonderful - absolutely sweet and well-behaved (albeit very possessive of his family and clannish). Now that he''s older he has developed a slight heart murmur.

But honestly, even as I say all this, it was a matter of luck. You definitely need to do a lot of research - not just into the breed but into the breeders. Look for breeders registered with reputable kennel clubs, etc. And get a vet check very soon after bringing the pup home.

Good luck!
 

kama_s

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jul 12, 2008
Messages
3,617
Hmm, my neighbor has a cute fluffy dog that wouldn't be longer than 8-9 inches - she honestly looks like a little cuddly toy. I dont know what breed she is, but she has that weird hacking/snorting thing going as well. They took the dog to the vet, but the vet said there's nothing wrong with her.

What about a smaller Shih Tzu? They can get a little bigger than 7lbs, but they're so cute and relatively easy to please!
 

beach

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Dec 16, 2007
Messages
714
We have two ShihTzus and they are great!!! However, just like any dog, size varies and you really can't know for sure in the end. Shihtzus can range from 5-20 pounds. I would stay away from the little/imperial sizes. They are being bred so small (to meet demand for small "cute" dogs) and are known to have problems like very small nostrils and elongated palet issues due to their snub faces. If you go with a shihtzu get a standard size and find a nice breeder that just breeds shihtzus and stay away from puppy mills.

Also, if you want a dog less than 7 pounds, understand that you may need to feed more often to avoid things like hypoglycemia etc... When choosing a small dog try and get the largest one of the litter and avoid the runts. The little ones are at higher risk for developmental defects. seizures etc... Always meet the parents and see how they are doing.
 

makemepretty

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Feb 26, 2004
Messages
987
I have three tiny dogs. One chihuahua and two yorkies. The chihuahua is 5 lbs the yorkies are smaller(approx. 3.5 and 2.5) My best advice...look for a good breeder, it''s worth the money to pay extra for the puppy now rather than later on vet bills.

None of my dogs have ever had any health problems. Chihuahua(Tinker) is 10 1/2, Yorkie(Lola) 3, Yorkie(Talula) 2. I would never recommend a chihuahua if you are around any children. I have two boys, which she likes but she HATES other children. So, when my nieces and nephews come over she has to be crated.

The yorkies are very friends and loving. They also don''t shed! I do brush their long hair daily to keep it free from tangles and give them a bath once a week. I also feed them Canidae Lamb & Rice food because yorkies can be sensitive to corn. A good food is very important.

My brother has a maltese/shih tzu mix, she''s going to be 7lbs or so and is great with his little girls(5 & 2). My kids have always been around little dogs so they know how fragile they can be, I tell small kids visiting to not pick them up. If I ever feel the dogs are stressed or kids won''t know how to be around them I put them in my bedroom.

I wouldn''t recommend three dogs at once, it can be a little overwhelming. One or two is usually a better number. We''ve taken two with us to hotels and they''ve done fine. Good luck, the fun part is looking.

I''ve also in my lifetime had a pekingese and long haired chihuahua(they lived to the ages of 12 & 15). I wouldn''t advise either of them though. I''ve heard Maltese are very loving and calm. Yorkies can be a little more energetic since they are terriers. I would love to own a Maltese someday. Hope this helps.
 

sba771

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Jun 1, 2008
Messages
887
I have an 8 lb min pin. I love him to death and he is spoiled. I know the big thing is doing your homework and research. Also I would suggest not letting a little dog get too comfortable being carried. You should let a little dog grow a personality and socialize. Right away we took Darth to the dog parks so he could get comfortable with dogs of all sizes and not be scared. Having a small dog is great. I had to travel to Europe and he sat under my seat which made me very happy and he does come shopping with me.
 

Aloros

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
May 2, 2006
Messages
947
Our doggy is seven or eight pounds I think? She''s 1/2 chihuahua and 1/2 jack russell terrier. I know my vet told me that one of her ovaries was slightly deformed when they spayed her, but they also said everything else looked fine, and it was nothing to worry about. She''s very healthy - probably because she''s a mutt
. She has an excessive amount of energy and I could jog with her if I wanted to, despite her size.

She is also a handful, but we love love love her. She''s our little princess.

I''ve attached a photo just so you can see how adorable she is!


devincute2.jpg
 

anniee19

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Mar 31, 2008
Messages
308
I''ve had my little maltese mix for over a year now. He weights 9 lbs, and is the sweetest dog I''ve known! We got him at 4 months old and he was never hyper, or a biter like lots of puppies go through. He has always been calm, but loves to play and especially cuddle. He has had a clean bill of health.
 

LamborghiniGirl

Shiny_Rock
Trade
Joined
Mar 9, 2009
Messages
419
Thanks for all of the responses.

How do you know if a place is a "puppy mill"?

I love chihuahuas, but I would like a dog that is pretty friendly with children. Not that I have any, but when I go home etc. it would be important.

My first choice is still a Maltese, but Yorkies sound wonderful as well.

How did all of you deal with bathroom training? I have heard a bunch of different methods from online information sites for small dogs, but what have you found that works?
 

stepcutgirl

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Mar 11, 2009
Messages
1,746
I''ve had two super small dogs. One was a tiny poodle and she was abut 5 lbs and the other I was told was a yorki poo but ended up being a mutt mix of dachshund, poodle, yorkie and scottie. He was freaking adorable and he weighed in at 3lbs. The mix was very sturdy and healthy, I gave him away due to the fact that I took on too much with him and we have 2 other dogs but I still see him and he has a great home and he is doing fantastic. The poodle I had was old. I believe 10 when I adopted her and she had a crushed trachea all kinds of spinal problems. I have no way of knowing if these were due to something happening to her or if she was born that way

Pure breed tiny dogs are always going to be at a far greater risk of health problems than a mix, even in larger dogs. We have a chow/shepherd mix and he is quite healthy except for a little arthritis. We also have my baby, a pure bred poodle who is not tiny. He''s bigger than your average mini poodle (not the tea cup tiny) and he has heart problems that I do know he was born with. Ihave also owned 3 other poodles and all of them regardless of size had major health issues.
 

Miscka

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Apr 9, 2007
Messages
1,938
I have a chihuahua, but he is 12lbs.

I bought him after a break up and it was very healing


Avoid places that advertise "tea cup" chihuahuas, there is no such thing and like someone said breeding for demand for teeny dogs is dangerous and irresponsible.

Also avoid places that have more than one or maybe two breeds. See how many litters a year they have, how often each mom has a litter. Things like that.

I also agree to make sure not to treat them too terribly differently than large dogs...that way they are independent and well-behaved, but you still get all the great benefits of having a small dog! I love that I can take my dog anywhere, or pick him up quickly if I need to.

I honestly never saw myself as a small dog person, but my lifestyle would not allow for a large dg for many years. I am really glad that I did, I am a total convert. My chi is so completely loving and a wonderful companion.

Good luck! I think you will be very happy with a small dog.
 

sba771

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Jun 1, 2008
Messages
887
Date: 4/15/2009 10:27:41 AM
Author: LamborghiniGirl
Thanks for all of the responses.


How do you know if a place is a ''puppy mill''?


I love chihuahuas, but I would like a dog that is pretty friendly with children. Not that I have any, but when I go home etc. it would be important.


My first choice is still a Maltese, but Yorkies sound wonderful as well.


How did all of you deal with bathroom training? I have heard a bunch of different methods from online information sites for small dogs, but what have you found that works?
To avoid puppy mills my biggest piece of advice is avoid backyard breeders or pet shops. If you want a purebred I would suggest you go to the breed''s AKC website and only use breeders they recommend OR you could look into a breed specific rescue to either adopt or they can help point you in the right direction of a kosher breeder. With today''s economy you would be surprised how many purebred puppies are being returned and up for adoption.

We wee wee pad trained our puppy. We opted not to crate train and could not come home from work to walk him, so he has a special place where his pad is and he can go there during the day. We still walk him every chance we get. We plan on breaking the wee wee pad habit once we get a house, but for apt living it works for us.
 

AmberGretchen

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 6, 2005
Messages
7,770
LG, I don''t have time to write a super-long post about this right now, but this website is a GREAT starting point in your search - I''d strongly encourage you to look through it thoroughly while you consider your decision.

Puppy mills, unfortunately, account for basically all dogs in pet stores and also the vast majority of dogs sold over the internet. And your previous pup had, it sounds like, some of the more mild problems these animals can have. Many of the puppies go to their new homes with Parvo or Distemper, which more often than not, are fatal, and its not a pretty death. Its heartbreaking, actually, and I wouldn''t wish it on anyone.

I''d strongly strongly encourage you to look into rescue. There are MANY healthy, small dogs, who are wonderful wonderful pets that just got unlucky and ended up without a home. There''s really no reason to buy a dog unless you need very specific traits, and it sounds like you just want a small, happy, friendly pet. If you let me know approximately where you are located I''d be more than happy to look up small dog-specific rescues in your area and help you out investigating them.
 

LamborghiniGirl

Shiny_Rock
Trade
Joined
Mar 9, 2009
Messages
419
Thanks AmberGretchen,

I am in South Carolina but my bf lives in North Carolina so anywhere between Charleston, SC and Charlotte, NC on a map would be a convenient place to stop by to check out.

I have nothing against rescues, I just have never had good luck at them finding a kitten or puppy I've fallen in love with.

I know you can never know for sure how big a puppy will grow to be, but I am really hoping to find one in the 6 ish range. But of course, I wouldn't want to sacrifice on their health just for a tiny dog.

I have a mountain of work and calls to make, but later this afternoon I am also going to look at the official Maltese website for breeder listings in my area.


Question for all:

What are important questions (and the correct answers I should get) when talking to a prospective breeder about their puppies health/ how they were raised/etc? I want to be an educated buyer of a puppy, just like I will be for diamonds


Like, is it unreasonable to require I can bring the puppy to a vet of my choice, and if the puppy has problems the breeder didn't disclose, I can get my money back? Is that a common/ok request?


EDIT: I just looked at the website AmberGretchen posted, which has some great questions I should ask, but are there any questions any of you asked, that from personal experience really helped weed through the 'not-so-good' breeders?
 

lyra

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jul 13, 2007
Messages
5,166
Only buy from a breeder who will give you a health *guarantee* on any puppy you buy. I personally would only buy a purebred puppy from a breeder who is active in showing their dogs. What you get when buying from a good breeder is a healthy dog of sound body and mind. They will have bred to eliminate congenital defects as much as possible, and will take the dog back if for whatever reason it doesn't work out for you. You will pay more, wait longer too. But in this case you get what you pay for in terms of quality. Anyone can *ask* for a lot of money for a purebred puppy, but a truly good breeder's dogs are far and away worth the price. Be prepared to be put on a waiting list, and to be interviewed by the breeder. Contrary to popular belief, good breeders make very little money from breeding their dogs. So much goes into health checks and other costs, the breeder's hope is just to break even on a litter which may cost thousands of dollars to raise just to the 8 week point.

ETA: if you know what breed you are looking for, you can try contacting that breed's rescue group. They sometimes have puppies available. Some small breeds take a lot of time and energy to care for. Our chihuahua is a real handful, and I am at home with her day and night. It may be easier to have an older young dog if you are working full time. Just a few ideas.
 

jet2ks

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Feb 3, 2009
Messages
2,022
What are important questions (and the correct answers I should get) when talking to a prospective breeder about their puppies health/ how they were raised/etc? I want to be an educated buyer of a puppy, just like I will be for diamonds


Like, is it unreasonable to require I can bring the puppy to a vet of my choice, and if the puppy has problems the breeder didn't disclose, I can get my money back? Is that a common/ok request?


EDIT: I just looked at the website AmberGretchen posted, which has some great questions I should ask, but are there any questions any of you asked, that from personal experience really helped weed through the 'not-so-good' breeders?
One thing some really good breeders will do is give a health guarantee. It basically says that if a genetic health problem appears within a certain time (usu. 1-2yrs) then they will buy back the dog, refund part of the purchase or supply a replacement puppy from another litter (differs by breeder). Of course, by this time you are attached to the dog and wouldn't want to "trade-in", but the fact the breeder gives this guarantee is usually a good sign that they research the genealogy of potential matings to avoid the genetic problems.

Miscka has some good questions, as well. Quality breeders focus on improving their breed, not making a profit, so they only have one or two breeds and small numbers of females around. A female should have at most one litter a year (puppy mills will breed them every heat cycle).

A couple of other things. You WILL pay more for a puppy from a good breeder, though sometimes those that are breeding show dogs will have "pet quality" puppies and refund part of the purchase price after proof of spaying or neutering. The extra cost up front is worth it, because you will have fewer medical bills than a dog with health problems. Also, don't be afraid to have a puppy shipped in from a good breeder that is not in your area. Many are used to shipping puppies via the airlines and will match your desires for size and personality with the puppy, just call and ask.

Best of luck on your search. Be patient, as mentioned the good breeders don't breed often and many times have waiting lists for their puppies--this is also a good sign.

EDT: lyra, you must have posted right as I started typing.
 

beach

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Dec 16, 2007
Messages
714
First of all mixed breeds are not heartier than pure breeds. That is a myth and bad genes can be transfered just as easily as good genes. As for purebreeds being the best that is not right either and that argument kind of reminds me of Nazi Germany. We chose shihtzus because they were the best for our lifestyle not because they were "pure" or "mixed" breed. There is risk with any dog and your job is to lower that risk as much as possible. Do what makes you happy and just make sure that you research the breed!! Always see the dogs parents and play with them too. Get genetic defect gaurantees. Puppy mills are the places that often sell multiple breeds with the primary intent to make money and not better the breed. Stick with a place that only breeds one breed. Mills often post cute pictures of the dogs in costumes so that they sell quickly. A dog should sell based on breeding and not on some silly costume. Find a breeder and interview them too.

As for having a dog shipped to you I would not recommend it. It is very stressful on the dog. They were just weened off their mom and then you have them shipped? Does not makes sense IMO and I believe that people should just buy a ticket. It is better to get on a plane yourself and travel with the the dog rather than stick them down in the cargo hold for 5+ hours. We would never do that to a human baby even though they would survive too...
 

LadyBlue

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Mar 14, 2009
Messages
1,616
I used to have a chihuahua, she died after 15 years, she was great until her last 3 years when she got really old.

I love her, and if one day I decided to have another dog, I will get another chihuahua.

Good luck
 

tlh

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Dec 31, 2008
Messages
4,511
I wanted a "purse puppy" when I got my dog, I wanted a tiny yorkie in particular. But I worked long hours and had a long commute to the office. I am now in a position w/ a lot more freedom, and I'll be living 1 mile away from the office... which would now be ideal for the purse puppy I wanted. (I am not in the market right now.) I had a girlfriend who had a little 2.5 pound yorkie named pebbles, and pebbles left puddles all over the house. I decided I didn't want to be living w/ a dog that peed everywhere - or find that acceptable, since I would not be able to let my dog out every 3-4 hours.

I took a quiz online http://animal.discovery.com/breedselector/dogselector.do (this wasn't it, but this was the general idea) and found out my match dog was a cavalier king charles spaniel (12-18 pounds) and he is not a purse puppy, but he is a smaller dog (a perfect lap dog). Since I wasn't able to be there for potty training, I met a local breeder and found an older dog that she had available. She took dogs back from owners if things didn't work out, and would re-place them to a new loving home. He was not breedable - which was fine by me... but his owner got sick, and was placed into an assisted living community that did not allow pets... so he had to give up my dog.

DH and I comment often about how my dog is my "perfect match" -- and it is funny because i would not have found this dog attractive or picked it based on physical attributes.... but he is the perfect dog for me... and I cannot complain. Since you are opne on breeds.. maybe a quiz would help pinpoint what you are looking for in your companion breed.

Best wishes!
 

Italiahaircolor

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Dec 16, 2007
Messages
5,184
I have three chihuahua''s and I adore them to bits and pieces.

First of all, you should know going into it, little dogs live a very, very long time...upwards of 15 years in some cases. They often have teeth problems, and a gammet of other aliments due to their petite size, so the likelyhood of actually finding a dog that will never have health problems is probably slim to none--but thats regardless of size, I''d believe. They always think they are about 100x''s their actual size! They are harder to train, and need a lot of "bathroom breaks" due to the small size of their bladders.

But....

They are wonderful companions.

Our newest edition, Itsy, is the first puppy I''ve purchased through a breeder. My other two Chihuahua''s were both rescues. When selecting Isty, I met both parents and got her full pedigree as registered with the AKC. I know, going into it, that there is no patella or any other "red flags"...but the rest is simply chance...a year from now she could come up with something unpredictable, thats just life--you know?

If you''re going through a breeder, I suggest finding a reputable one through the AKC, spend time getting to know their kennel and their dogs since K9 personalities differ so much.

I would also strongly suggest getting a puppy in the warmer seasons (I don''t know where you live). Small dogs are always harder to housebreak, and doing it in the fall/winter months is almost pointless since they freeze instantly and they are too cold to do their business (well, here in Chicago at least).

Another good investment in your puppies future is pupply class. I cannot say that enough. The proper training makes all the difference in a dogs life. You''re happier, the dog is happier...win/win. PetSmart offers an 8 week class for $119.00...you simply cannot afford not too!

Oh...and another thing to consider is that small dogs often have a hard time around small/little children. I don''t know why this is, but it is.

Lastly, before buying a puppy, please consider rescue. While I adore Itsy to death...I love my other two equally as much. Knowing that I saved them makes our bond that much greater...they are more appreciative, if that makes sense, it''s like they know. Rescues sometimes get puppies in so it''s not like you would be committing yourself to an older dog by going this route. Just some food for thought.
 

Miscka

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Apr 9, 2007
Messages
1,938
Ditto a lot of what Italia said...especially the warmer months part!

I think Rhett (my chi) has been more difficult to potty train, but I live in an apartment and have to take him every time, so it is partially (if not totally) my fault. He is FINALLY completely housebroken and I am quite proud. And actually, he has done better than a lot of the small dogs I know. I personally couldn''t handle pee pads, but am lucky enough to have lived close enough to work to let him out mid-day. He is crate trained, though I work at home now so he is rarely if ever in there.

I would also try to visit the breeder...I met Rhett''s parents and it was great to see them in person. I had already figured I would get him (had seen pics of the litter) but when I came in the door, it was like he chose me too! It was so much fun to see all of his family and "friends".

I also want to echo what Italia said about small children. For some reason, Rhett LOVES little kids but many do not. I am not sure how to test this, unless you have a small child you could take with you to visit the puppies?

You could google for chihuahua forums (cant link you) and there are some good rescue/breeder resources there if you really are thinking about a chi.

I started a chi thread awhile back with some great pics of PS chis!
 

sba771

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Jun 1, 2008
Messages
887
Date: 4/15/2009 3:57:21 PM
Author: Miscka
Ditto a lot of what Italia said...especially the warmer months part!


I think Rhett (my chi) has been more difficult to potty train, but I live in an apartment and have to take him every time, so it is partially (if not totally) my fault. He is FINALLY completely housebroken and I am quite proud. And actually, he has done better than a lot of the small dogs I know. I personally couldn''t handle pee pads, but am lucky enough to have lived close enough to work to let him out mid-day. He is crate trained, though I work at home now so he is rarely if ever in there.


I would also try to visit the breeder...I met Rhett''s parents and it was great to see them in person. I had already figured I would get him (had seen pics of the litter) but when I came in the door, it was like he chose me too! It was so much fun to see all of his family and ''friends''.


I also want to echo what Italia said about small children. For some reason, Rhett LOVES little kids but many do not. I am not sure how to test this, unless you have a small child you could take with you to visit the puppies?


You could google for chihuahua forums (cant link you) and there are some good rescue/breeder resources there if you really are thinking about a chi.


I started a chi thread awhile back with some great pics of PS chis!
OMG Miscka I am soooo jealous you got to name your Chi Rhett! I was pushing for Rhett Butler so hard, but sadly my Star Wars loving FI won and we have a Darth Vader instead.
 

Miscka

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Apr 9, 2007
Messages
1,938
Date: 4/15/2009 4:07:57 PM
Author: sba771
Date: 4/15/2009 3:57:21 PM

Author: Miscka

Ditto a lot of what Italia said...especially the warmer months part!



I think Rhett (my chi) has been more difficult to potty train, but I live in an apartment and have to take him every time, so it is partially (if not totally) my fault. He is FINALLY completely housebroken and I am quite proud. And actually, he has done better than a lot of the small dogs I know. I personally couldn''t handle pee pads, but am lucky enough to have lived close enough to work to let him out mid-day. He is crate trained, though I work at home now so he is rarely if ever in there.



I would also try to visit the breeder...I met Rhett''s parents and it was great to see them in person. I had already figured I would get him (had seen pics of the litter) but when I came in the door, it was like he chose me too! It was so much fun to see all of his family and ''friends''.



I also want to echo what Italia said about small children. For some reason, Rhett LOVES little kids but many do not. I am not sure how to test this, unless you have a small child you could take with you to visit the puppies?



You could google for chihuahua forums (cant link you) and there are some good rescue/breeder resources there if you really are thinking about a chi.



I started a chi thread awhile back with some great pics of PS chis!

OMG Miscka I am soooo jealous you got to name your Chi Rhett! I was pushing for Rhett Butler so hard, but sadly my Star Wars loving FI won and we have a Darth Vader instead.
Ahahaha! I love it! Darth Vader the minpin!

It''s funny, people either think its hilarious or have no idea who that is. But I usually call him both names....Rhett Butler, as does my BF. I think its funnier that way! Or I call him RB. GWTW is my fave movie and I REALLY want another dog I can name Scarlett O''Hara! I would get another chi in a heart beat but BF has a greyhound and wants something between the two, which is fair.
 

MonkeyPie

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Apr 23, 2008
Messages
6,059
I love this thread! My test answers say I should have a spitz, an American Eskimo Dog, and OMG he''s so freaking cute. I have got to have one now.
 

jet2ks

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Feb 3, 2009
Messages
2,022
Did you try the links in the upper left? Those worked for me, but the one at the bottom of the page got an error.
 

Maisie

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Dec 30, 2006
Messages
12,578
Date: 4/15/2009 8:25:40 AM
Author: Aloros
Our doggy is seven or eight pounds I think? She''s 1/2 chihuahua and 1/2 jack russell terrier. I know my vet told me that one of her ovaries was slightly deformed when they spayed her, but they also said everything else looked fine, and it was nothing to worry about. She''s very healthy - probably because she''s a mutt
. She has an excessive amount of energy and I could jog with her if I wanted to, despite her size.

She is also a handful, but we love love love her. She''s our little princess.

I''ve attached a photo just so you can see how adorable she is!
She is gorgeous!!!
 

lyra

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jul 13, 2007
Messages
5,166
LG, you should be aware that pretty much anyone can be an AKC breeder. There have been puppy mill situations where the dogs were AKC registerable. A good breeder will be a member of the AKC, but just being a member does not make one a good breeder. That's why I have suggested looking for show breeders if you are intent on a purebred. Often retired showdogs are also available, or young adults. Usually better breeders will also support the rescue associations.

We used to show dogs, which is how I know about some of the practices. Our older dogs are both show quality dogs, which are usually only available to homes who will be showing the dogs. We did that with our oldest dog, but our second dog we didn't show and that was okay with her breeder. Our chihuahua was an adoptee we really didn't expect, but are thrilled nonetheless. The older dogs are 11 and 13 this year, and neither has ever had any health problem whatsoever. At 13, our Bouvier is just starting to have some issues with his hips, and we'll be taking him in to look at anti-inflammatory drugs soon (he's not that bad yet), that that's exceptional IMO. Our terrier is basically a tank. We don't know anything about our Chihuahua's breeder or her pedigree, so we'll have to take our chances with her. But she's just as loved as the other two regardless.


ETA: this is of no real relevance whatsoever, but someone old and wise (??) once told us to "Never buy a winter dog, only a summer dog!". I have no idea why, and although we didn't intend to take this advice, all our dogs have summer birthdays: June, August, September. That meant all were potty trained in the winter, and yes, that was not fun at all, but even our Chi has finally managed (just shy of 8 months) to get the hang of it all.
 
Status
Not open for further replies. Please create a new topic or request for this thread to be opened.
Be a part of the community It's free, join today!
    What is White Gold?
    What is White Gold?
    Push Present: Engagement Ring Upgrade
    Push Present: Engagement Ring Upgrade
    20th Anniversary Upgrade
    20th Anniversary Upgrade

Need Something Special?

Get a quote from multiple trusted and vetted jewelers.

Holloway Cut Advisor



Diamond Eye Candy

Click to view full-size image.
Top