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What is the deal with needing insoles?

Discussion in 'Healthy Lifestyle' started by MichelleCarmen, Jul 11, 2008.

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  1. MichelleCarmen
    Super_Ideal_Rock

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    by MichelleCarmen » Jul 11, 2008
    Question - do most of you all buy insoles for your workout shoes?

    I ALWAYS do, but decided to save some money and just bought new cross trainers. After only a month, my feet are aching on the bottom. WHY do manufacturers make inferior products that require a second purchase.

    Anyone have good luck with a shoe not needing those?

    I generally buy New Balance for using on the step.
     
    


    


  2. Skippy123
    Super_Ideal_Rock

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    by Skippy123 » Jul 11, 2008
    MC, have you gone to one of those running stores where they have you walk barefoot on a treadmill and recommend the type of shoe you need? Those places are great; I would look for one near you.
     
  3. LtlFirecracker
    Ideal_Rock

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    by LtlFirecracker » Jul 11, 2008
    To put it simply. The insoles compensate for any mis-alignment when you run (or walk, or step).

    I am a pronator (I tend to favor the side of the foot my big toes are on) with narrow feet. I have found Nike's work well without needing the extra support. If you have flat feet, insoles really do help, but they do not need to be superexpensive. So in short, it depends on your problem. Some shoes are better for some problems than others.
     
  4. musey
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    by musey » Jul 11, 2008
    They're not inferior, it's just not possible to make a shoe that fits perfectly on everyone, as everyone has differently shaped feet.

    So anything that's right for me (I have had perfect luck with Asics), wouldn't be right for your foot.

    LtlFirecracker, I'm a pronator too! [​IMG]
     
    


    


  5. MichelleCarmen
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    by MichelleCarmen » Jul 12, 2008
    My running shoes are Asics and I love them! Okay, thanks for the help. I''m pretty sure I pronate too so it would seem New Balance are not for me. . . but, I just got a new pair, so it seems that one more pair of insoles will be required. (I''d feel stupid returning them after wearing them about 20 times!)
     
  6. Love2Travel
    Shiny_Rock

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    by Love2Travel » Jul 14, 2008
    Go to a actual running/walking store. I went to my local one and they were great. They measure your foot barefoot twice. The 1st time w/ no weight on it and the 2nd w/ you standing up. They then bring out a neutral sneaker. Since I am doing outdoor running, they have me run outside while they watched how my feet would land. Then you go back inside and they brought out 3 types of sneakers. They let me try them on and go running with them to see which is the best fit.

    If I were to do indoor running, they had a treadmill w/ cameras that capture how your feet land while running/walking.

    I got a great pair of adidas supernova sequence.
     
  7. brazen_irish_hussy
    Ideal_Rock

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    by brazen_irish_hussy » Jul 14, 2008
    It really depends on your feet. I have the world''s most average shaped feet and as such, can wear any running shoe without pain. My mom has very high arches and is only comfortable in one small brand. If they made all shoes that fit her high arches, my uncle with flat feet would find them uncomfortable, so it really is largely because you can''t fit everyone.

    I do find the shoes with the higher soles around the edge and hollow in the middle are better for my knees though, so there are other things to consider.
     
  8. asscherisme
    Ideal_Rock

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    by asscherisme » Jul 14, 2008
    I love sorbothane inserts in combo with new balance. When I tried to cheap out one time, my feet yelled at me!
     
  9. Amanda.Rx
    Brilliant_Rock

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    by Amanda.Rx » Jul 14, 2008
    I agree- go to a running store & if you want a really good pair of shoes or if you plan to do a LOT of running/walking, be prepared to spend $100 or more on a pair of shoes.

    I used to just buy whatever- Nike, New Balance, Adidas.

    I finally brought myself to buy a pair of Mizunos at the running store and paid about $115, but they are THE BEST SHOES I have EVER bought! It makes running feel like a breeze!

    There''s nothing worse than a crappy fitting shoe!
     
  10. strmrdr
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    by strmrdr » Jul 14, 2008
    I buy Spenco CrossTrainer Insoles for all my shoes.
    They turn a $15 pair of shoes into the most comfortable shoes for me.
    The shoes I wear all the time the insoles cost more than the shoes and while they have a 1 year warranty they only last me 6-8 months and they would send me a new pair for free I generally don''t take them up on it because I cant live comfortably without them and I feel I get my money worth out of them.
    http://www.footsmart.com/P-Polysorb-CrossTrainer-Insoles-10308.aspx
     
    


    


  11. cara
    Ideal_Rock

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    by cara » Jul 14, 2008
    I buy custom made $400 orthodics to wear in my trainers! And spend booku bucks on really good shoes that have appropriate pronation-control for my feet. I have knee/foot problems though, and it is just not worth it for me to go without.

    I do sometimes use Superfeet(maybe these are the "expensive" inserts you have used) but find the plastic too firm for me to wear all day. They will do in a pinch, and in certain shoes in which my orthodics don''t fit (ie. medium dressy shoes or ski boots.)

    New Balance is actually a really good shoe company with at least two styles of "lasts." The lasts are the shape of the foot the shoe is designed to fit. The more common New Balance last is for a wider foot with a roomy toe box, but they also have a narrower last that works well for me. Many of their shoes are also "orthodics compatible" meaning they are flat inside (once the wimpy insert is removed) so that an orthodic would lie flat. These "orthodics compatible" shoes might not be your best choice if you want structural arch support integrated into the shoe.

    So if New Balance doesn''t work, try something else! I have also had luck with Saucony shoes with arch-lock when I was between orthodics. The arch lock provides some arch suport but interferes with using a separate orthodic insert.
     
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