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Newbie searching for emerald

Venus8

Rough_Rock
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Hi, I'm very new to colored gemstones and am looking for an emerald between 1-2.5 carats. I found the following on emeralds.com, which one of the salespeople was nice enough to compare for me (in comments, photos, and videos). The numbers correspond to the stones shown from left to right on the person's hand.

E2220- this does not show in the images but its a hair lighter than the others and maybe a HAIR more of a blue undertone, but not too much. This for me is the cleanest
E2100- best cut, clean green color. This actually has a slight visible inclusion, I changed it to very slightly included
E2655- most included, similar green to above.




Any comments on these? I also found the following one on Leibish.com. It's much larger but similar in price. Does anyone know why? Any comparison comments?


Lastly, gemsny.com (not a favorite of many on pricescope, I think), has these. Any thoughts?







I'm hoping to find a stone very soon, which is why I'm not looking for a rough stone to be cut for me.

Apologies for listing so many options, but as a newbie, even though I've read articles on colored stones, I find I'm not educated enough to narrow down the choices easily.

Or, should I just fly to NY or somewhere else to look at stones in person? I'm on the other side of the country, so it's not entirely convenient. Any input or other suggestions are very much appreciated!
 
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Hello and welcome to the forum! Here are my honest opinions:

Both E2655 and E2220 have large windows (cutting defects), so, personally, I would immediately strike them from contention. E2100 has promise, but I would want to know the degree of oiling.

The Leibish stone gets a hard pass from me... I don't care for the color, saturation, or clarity (it looks to have a large fracture running lengthwise, which could be a durability issue).

With regard to the GemsNY stones, this is difficult, because their images are so overblown and unrealistic. You'll need to ask for additional pix/vids for sure. All the ones you chose have been given this vendor's "heirloom" quality designation, which means they are the best they have (aside from unoiled stones). But I would eliminate some right off the bat... E3584COV and E3818DOV are both heavily windowed. E3917OV is also windowed and I'm not fond of the clarity. E3922BOV is listed as "medium green," which probably translates to it having weaker saturation than the others. But I like the cut and clarity. E3950AOV is listed as a "vivid green," but looks a bit dark to my eyes. I like the cut and clarity. This one might be worth a closer look... what appears "dark" in the pix/vids may just be intense saturation in person. Lastly, we have E3932DOV. This one is also listed as vivid green... cut and clarity look good. This one might also be worth a closer look.

So out of the options you gave, I would say 3 warrant consideration... 2 from GemsNY and 1 from the NEC. All purely my opinions, of course! Again, I would need to know the extent of clarity enhancement. Simply stating "standard" under treatments is far too vague. Good luck!!
 
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I think it depends on your budget. You are looking primarily at Zambians. Is it due to budget?

This is a good question... I believe all of the options are Zambian. If OP's budget allows, and she's looking for top tier color, it may be worth browsing Colombian material. There's a reason why those stones are so highly coveted.
 

Venus8

Rough_Rock
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I think it depends on your budget. You are looking primarily at Zambians. Is it due to budget?

Regarding budget, I am not wanting to go significantly over $6,000. I didn't intentionally pick out Zambians, but I did read somewhere that they have good color, and perhaps fewer inclusions than Columbian emeralds (but I recognize this was just one comment I read, and it could be completely wrong). Do you suggest avoiding Zambians?
 
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Regarding budget, I am not wanting to go significantly over $6,000. I didn't intentionally pick out Zambians, but I did read somewhere that they have good color, and perhaps fewer inclusions than Columbian emeralds (but I recognize this was just one comment I read, and it could be completely wrong). Do you suggest avoiding Zambians?

I'm sure T L will be along to answer your question, but I thought I'd add my 2 cents. Zambian emeralds can be really beautiful, so, yes, you should definitely browse them. I just consider Colombian material to be top echelon in terms of color. But there are plenty of lousy Colombian stones out there too! So the wider your parameters in terms of origin is always a good thing, IMO. :)
 

Venus8

Rough_Rock
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Hello and welcome to the forum! Here are my honest opinions:

Both E2655 and E2220 have large windows (cutting defects), so, personally, I would immediately strike them from contention. E2100 has promise, but I would want to know the degree of oiling.

The Leibish stone gets a hard pass from me... I don't care for the color, saturation, or clarity (it looks to have a large fracture running lengthwise, which could be a durability issue).

With regard to the GemsNY stones, this is difficult, because their images are so overblown and unrealistic. You'll need to ask for additional pix/vids for sure. All the ones you chose have been given this vendor's "heirloom" quality designation, which means they are the best they have (aside from unoiled stones). But I would eliminate some right off the bat... E3584COV and E3818DOV are both heavily windowed. E3917OV is also windowed and I'm not fond of the clarity. E3922BOV is listed as "medium green," which probably translates to it having weaker saturation than the others. But I like the cut and clarity. E3950AOV is listed as a "vivid green," but looks a bit dark to my eyes. I like the cut and clarity. This one might be worth a closer look... what appears "dark" in the pix/vids may just be intense saturation in person. Lastly, we have E3932DOV. This one is also listed as vivid green... cut and clarity look good. This one might also be worth a closer look.

So out of the options you gave, I would say 3 warrant consideration... 2 from GemsNY and 1 from the NEC. All purely my opinions, of course! Again, I would need to know the extent of clarity enhancement. Simply stating "standard" under treatments is far too vague. Good luck!!

Wow - thank you for all this great information/education! I did wonder about possible windows in E2655 and E2220. But without an educated eye, I wasn't at all sure. Thank you so much for letting me know! I will spend some time looking at the others and carefully reviewing your comments.

It seems like buying colored stones is either a mine field or requires a lot of self-education before biting the bullet! Is this your experience? Do you buy stones over the Internet or only ones you've seen in person?

I will ask GemsNY for further info/images of the two you suggested. I've decided I like their shape better than the one from NEC you said was worth considering. So much to learn! I'm very grateful for your help!
 
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Venus8

Rough_Rock
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I'm sure T L will be along to answer your question, but I thought I'd add my 2 cents. Zambian emeralds can be really beautiful, so, yes, you should definitely browse them. I just consider Colombian material to be top echelon in terms of color. But there are plenty of lousy Colombian stones out there too! So the wider your parameters in terms of origin is always a good thing, IMO. :)

Great, thank you! This is very helpful.
 
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Wow - thank you for all this great information/education! I did wonder about possible windows in E2655 and E2220. But without an educated eye, I wasn't at all sure. Thank you so much for letting me know! I will spend some time looking at the others and carefully reviewing your comments to start my training.

It seems like buying colored stones is either a mine field or requires a lot of self-education before biting the bullet. Is this your experience? How do you buy stones? Do you recommend only buying ones you've seen in person? And should one simply not buy anything until one becomes slightly more educated? Or do you have someone you trust from whom you buy? I do have a timeline I was wanting to adhere to for this purchase, but maybe it's just not realistic ...

These are all really good questions, and they tell me that you will be a quick study. Absolutely, buying colored gems is a mine field. No doubt about it. If you're a diamond collector, it's very different... literally every stone is unique (and you must contend with treatments).

I studied at the GIA, and completed all of my classes, except 2 labs to become a G.G. Not sure if they've added any other requirements since that time, but Covid and my day job sort of killed my ability to travel into NYC regularly. Hopefully, I'll finish it up some day!

That aside, the best way to self-educate, IMO, is to look at as many stones in person as possible. Gem shows are a great resource. And it's helpful to start by purchasing beginner quality stones until you get your bearings. I actually don't know that I've ever purchased a stone having first seen it in person! But I feel very comfortable with my ability to suss out the winners and losers at this point, and I mostly buy from trusted vendors with generous return policies. And, yes, reports from reputable labs will be your best friend, especially when spending $$$.

I don't want to derail your timeframe, but I would definitely recommend taking the time to acquaint yourself with CS basics and also the specific nuances of emerald color, clarity, and treatment. The better informed a buyer you are, the more likely your purchase will be something you'll cherish for a lifetime.
 

T L

Super_Ideal_Rock
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I'm sure T L will be along to answer your question, but I thought I'd add my 2 cents. Zambian emeralds can be really beautiful, so, yes, you should definitely browse them. I just consider Colombian material to be top echelon in terms of color. But there are plenty of lousy Colombian stones out there too! So the wider your parameters in terms of origin is always a good thing, IMO. :)

I agree, and if clarity is really important to you, then Zambian is the way to go because they are not as stress fractured and as Colombian material. There are other locales with beautiful stones too like Ethiopia, Afghanistan, Russia and even North Carolina, USA, but Zambian tend to be pretty clean in comparison. They are more affordable than Colombian if clarity, carat weight, tone and hue are the same.


Make sure they come with a lab report indicating type of treatment and how much is used.
 

Venus8

Rough_Rock
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These are all really good questions, and they tell me that you will be a quick study. Absolutely, buying colored gems is a mine field. No doubt about it. If you're a diamond collector, it's very different... literally every stone is unique (and you must contend with treatments).

I studied at the GIA, and completed all of my classes, except 2 labs to become a G.G. Not sure if they've added any other requirements since that time, but Covid and my day job sort of killed my ability to travel into NYC regularly. Hopefully, I'll finish it up some day!

That aside, the best way to self-educate, IMO, is to look at as many stones in person as possible. Gem shows are a great resource. And it's helpful to start by purchasing beginner quality stones until you get your bearings. I actually don't know that I've ever purchased a stone having first seen it in person! But I feel very comfortable with my ability to suss out the winners and losers at this point, and I mostly buy from trusted vendors with generous return policies. And, yes, reports from reputable labs will be your best friend, especially when spending $$$.

I don't want to derail your timeframe, but I would definitely recommend taking the time to acquaint yourself with CS basics and also the specific nuances of emerald color, clarity, and treatment. The better informed a buyer you are, the more likely your purchase will be something you'll cherish for a lifetime.

Thank you so much - this is extremely helpful! I appreciate your kind comments. If anything, I can tend to overanalyze, so while I want to become educated, I also don't want to wait until I'm 95 to make a purchase!

Do you mean diamond collecting is different b/c it's easier to make comparisons based on specs? Just want to make sure I understand your comment.

I hope you're able to complete your certification as well - sounds like you've already learned a tremendous amount!

Thank you for the suggestion about gem shows. Do you think local shows like Seattle (my area) are good enough, or does one need to do something like go to the one in Tucson? I don't plan on making a career out of gems or even becoming a serious collector, so I certainly don't want to make things harder than needed. But your comment about taking the time to buy something I will love for a lifetime is spot-on.

What do you consider beginner quality stones? I am glad to hear that with the proper education/guidance that it is possible to buy successfully online. May I ask which vendors you consider trusted (and who have generous return policies)? I looked at some of the recommendations on pricescope and saw that many seem to focus on bespoke stones (probably incorrect terminology, but I'm sure you know what I mean) rather than holding a lot of stock (understandable since people are particular about colored stones and holding a lot of inventory wouldn't be financially viable for most vendors). And of course this means one needs to be a bit patient (and get educated) in order to make a wise purchase ...

I wonder how many people out there who own colored stones are blissfully ignorant of the issues with their gems because they just bought what was pretty online and within their budget!
 

Venus8

Rough_Rock
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I agree, and if clarity is really important to you, then Zambian is the way to go because they are not as stress fractured and as Colombian material. There are other locales with beautiful stones too like Ethiopia, Afghanistan, Russia and even North Carolina, USA, but Zambian tend to be pretty clean in comparison. They are more affordable than Colombian if clarity, carat weight, tone and hue are the same.


Make sure they come with a lab report indicating type of treatment and how much is used.

Great, thank you so much! I know emeralds are known for inclusions, but that said, I really do love it when they have greater clarity. So I will take your kind and helpful advice about Zambian emeralds. Thank you again!
 

T L

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Great, thank you so much! I know emeralds are known for inclusions, but that said, I really do love it when they have greater clarity. So I will take your kind and helpful advice about Zambian emeralds. Thank you again!

You’re welcome. Lighter colored Colombian stones are less included too, but it’s hard to find clarity in the darker or more saturated shades.
 

T L

Super_Ideal_Rock
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You really need to make sure that you know the type and amount of treatment on the stone. I looked at one gemsny stone that had a GIA report and it stated moderate treatment. I would try to go with minor treatment for your price range. I think the Leibish stone us the best value, but I would want to know the type and amount of treatment. That’s really important when it comes to emeralds.

Standard oiling is the traditionally most common treatment, and purists will only accept oiled emeralds. The oil does dry up though so if you have a stone with more than minor treatment, it can look significantly more included over a few years and will need reoiling. There are modern polymers that are more stable and permanent.

It’s not enough to get an in house report saying only “oiling” or “clarity enhancement.” An independent lab report should verify type and amount.
 
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Do you mean diamond collecting is different b/c it's easier to make comparisons based on specs? Just want to make sure I understand your comment.
Most definitely! Because diamonds are so meticulously graded and those grades are universally applied, it's much easier to compare and contrast stones when shopping. If the cut pattern and quality is the same on 2 diamonds, and they're each 1ct. 6.5mm rounds graded F color, VS1 clarity, they're pretty much going to be identical. Not so with colored stones, because of the intricacies of color (hue, tone, and saturation), along with treatments and the degree thereof. FCD's are a bit different of course, but they still have a standard color grading system.

Thank you for the suggestion about gem shows. Do you think local shows like Seattle (my area) are good enough, or does one need to do something like go to the one in Tucson? I don't plan on making a career out of gems or even becoming a serious collector, so I certainly don't want to make things harder than needed. But your comment about taking the time to buy something I will love for a lifetime is spot-on.

Oh yeah, I'm sure the Seattle gem show would be a great learning experience! We don't necessarily need to see museum quality stones for our collecting purposes. Although, I do recommend it if you ever have the chance! :P2

What do you consider beginner quality stones? I am glad to hear that with the proper education/guidance that it is possible to buy successfully online. May I ask which vendors you consider trusted (and who have generous return policies)? I looked at some of the recommendations on pricescope and saw that many seem to focus on bespoke stones (probably incorrect terminology, but I'm sure you know what I mean) rather than holding a lot of stock (understandable since people are particular about colored stones and holding a lot of inventory wouldn't be financially viable for most vendors). And of course this means one needs to be a bit patient (and get educated) in order to make a wise purchase ...

Well, it depends on your budget. For some folks, it may be a $200 stone, for others it could be a $2,000 stone or more. That's not to say price necessarily dictates quality, but you get the idea. When I first started out, my dream stone was a padparadscha sapphire. I bought a 1.5ct. eye clean, unheated stone from Sri Lanka. It was a light-toned orangey-pink. It cost me $3,500. That was a BIG purchase for me at that time. Eventually, as my collecting became more serious, I sold that stone and purchased a 2ct. pad... more saturated this time (the first was too small and too washed out for my current tastes). But this stone was from Tanzania, which tend to have varying degrees of brown modifiers. My eyes weren't as well-attuned to that fact at the time. Again, my collecting progressed and my budget increased. I sold that gem and purchased a 5.5ct. pad from Sri Lanka. This stone, in my opinion, is the epitome of what the gem should be. I think it was the culmination of a lifetime of experience up to this point. And I don't see myself upgrading again, as I consider it an heirloom piece. I also don't see my budget ever going beyond what I paid for that stone. I've reached the ceiling! lol Anyway, that's just my 2 beans about buying and learning as you go along.
 
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May I ask which vendors you consider trusted (and who have generous return policies)? I looked at some of the recommendations on pricescope and saw that many seem to focus on bespoke stones (probably incorrect terminology, but I'm sure you know what I mean) rather than holding a lot of stock (understandable since people are particular about colored stones and holding a lot of inventory wouldn't be financially viable for most vendors). And of course this means one needs to be a bit patient (and get educated) in order to make a wise purchase ...

There are several, and I rely on each for different things. For instance, I purchased my current emerald from George Smith (of MuzoEmeralds on Instagram). He's a British ex-pat living in Colombia. So, with him, you go straight to the source. And, yes, he's more of a concierge service than your typical vendor. You tell him what you want, and he finds you options.


I wonder how many people out there who own colored stones are blissfully ignorant of the issues with their gems because they just bought what was pretty online and within their budget!

I think about this all the time. They are numerous! For instance, when I consider how I used to shop local (not mom & pop either... chain) jewelry stores. Now, that's not always a bad thing. Indeed, at least you get to see the piece in person before committing. But I never even knew to ask about ruby treatments. I was just spending my money on what the sales person told me was top tier. And there are people with enormous budgets doing the same thing! So it's not only a matter of money, but education, as you said. That seems insane to me now, of course. And, IMO, it's best to buy loose stones, as you know exactly what you're paying for, as opposed to accent stones, precious metals, labor, etc. That being said, the smart buyers always seek out information, as you did. As we all did!
 
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You’re welcome. Lighter colored Colombian stones are less included too, but it’s hard to find clarity in the darker or more saturated shades.

^ 100%. It's all a compromise (unless you have no budget).

The more chromium, the more saturated the green. And with that usually comes decreased clarity. This is why Zambian stones, for instance, tend to be less included. They are typically colored by vanadium, as opposed to chromium.
 

T L

Super_Ideal_Rock
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^ 100%. It's all a compromise (unless you have no budget).

The more chromium, the more saturated the green. And with that usually comes decreased clarity. This is why Zambian stones, for instance, tend to be less included. They are typically colored by vanadium, as opposed to chromium.

There is a combination of chromium, vanadium and iron in all emeralds, but the main coloring agent in Colombian stones is chromium, and Vanadium in Zambian. Colombian stones have the least amount of iron. The chromium, and low iron, gives the Colombian stone amazing color, but unfortunately it messes with the crystal lattice of beryl (the mineral that makes up emerald), hence the inclusions.

I do not recommend looking at George’s Muzo Instagram because you will forever be in lust and turn into the Gollum version of “Lord of the Emeralds.” Lol!

However, the great thing about emeralds is that you can find beautiful stones for a decent price. They do not have to be top Muzo quality like the stones in George’s Instagram.
 

Venus8

Rough_Rock
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You really need to make sure that you know the type and amount of treatment on the stone. I looked at one gemsny stone that had a GIA report and it stated moderate treatment. I would try to go with minor treatment for your price range. I think the Leibish stone us the best value, but I would want to know the type and amount of treatment. That’s really important when it comes to emeralds.

Standard oiling is the traditionally most common treatment, and purists will only accept oiled emeralds. The oil does dry up though so if you have a stone with more than minor treatment, it can look significantly more included over a few years and will need reoiling. There are modern polymers that are more stable and permanent.

It’s not enough to get an in house report saying only “oiling” or “clarity enhancement.” An independent lab report should verify type and amount.


You really need to make sure that you know the type and amount of treatment on the stone. I looked at one gemsny stone that had a GIA report and it stated moderate treatment. I would try to go with minor treatment for your price range. I think the Leibish stone us the best value, but I would want to know the type and amount of treatment. That’s really important when it comes to emeralds.

Standard oiling is the traditionally most common treatment, and purists will only accept oiled emeralds. The oil does dry up though so if you have a stone with more than minor treatment, it can look significantly more included over a few years and will need reoiling. There are modern polymers that are more stable and permanent.

It’s not enough to get an in house report saying only “oiling” or “clarity enhancement.” An independent lab report should verify type and amount.

Thank you very much for this added perspective! I decided to put the Leibish stone into the mix because although it's larger than I was generally expecting to be able to afford, it was in my price range, and I was interested in any opinions about it. Thank you very much for sharing your thoughts.

The gemsny stones are mainly F2 as you saw, including E3950AOV and E3932DOV, which otherwise seem to be the best bets. E3922BOV is F1, but seems to have an issue with color. So many things to consider! It's challenging for me to figure out what is highest priority. I am coming to the conclusion that I probably need more education (probably in-person at a gem show), which may take some time. I am thinking I may have to extend my timeline for an emerald purchase and find something else for the upcoming occasion. I'd rather do it right than make a semi-confused decision ...
 
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T L

Super_Ideal_Rock
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It’s best you see some in person. They are the most unphotogenic gems. When I photograph mine, it’s like photographing a Ferrari, but the photo shows a Yugo. No video or photo can really portray the deep color or metallic sheen these stones have. If green metallic satin was three dimensional, and transparent, that’s the best way I can describe them. The pale stones and some others can be more flat in color.
 

Venus8

Rough_Rock
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You really need to make sure that you know the type and amount of treatment on the stone. I looked at one gemsny stone that had a GIA report and it stated moderate treatment. I would try to go with minor treatment for your price range. I think the Leibish stone us the best value, but I would want to know the type and amount of treatment. That’s really important when it comes to emeralds.

Standard oiling is the traditionally most common treatment, and purists will only accept oiled emeralds. The oil does dry up though so if you have a stone with more than minor treatment, it can look significantly more included over a few years and will need reoiling. There are modern polymers that are more stable and permanent.

It’s not enough to get an in house report saying only “oiling” or “clarity enhancement.” An independent lab report should verify type and amount.

Most definitely! Because diamonds are so meticulously graded and those grades are universally applied, it's much easier to compare and contrast stones when shopping. If the cut pattern and quality is the same on 2 diamonds, and they're each 1ct. 6.5mm rounds graded F color, VS1 clarity, they're pretty much going to be identical. Not so with colored stones, because of the intricacies of color (hue, tone, and saturation), along with treatments and the degree thereof. FCD's are a bit different of course, but they still have a standard color grading system.



Oh yeah, I'm sure the Seattle gem show would be a great learning experience! We don't necessarily need to see museum quality stones for our collecting purposes. Although, I do recommend it if you ever have the chance! :P2



Well, it depends on your budget. For some folks, it may be a $200 stone, for others it could be a $2,000 stone or more. That's not to say price necessarily dictates quality, but you get the idea. When I first started out, my dream stone was a padparadscha sapphire. I bought a 1.5ct. eye clean, unheated stone from Sri Lanka. It was a light-toned orangey-pink. It cost me $3,500. That was a BIG purchase for me at that time. Eventually, as my collecting became more serious, I sold that stone and purchased a 2ct. pad... more saturated this time (the first was too small and too washed out for my current tastes). But this stone was from Tanzania, which tend to have varying degrees of brown modifiers. My eyes weren't as well-attuned to that fact at the time. Again, my collecting progressed and my budget increased. I sold that gem and purchased a 5.5ct. pad from Sri Lanka. This stone, in my opinion, is the epitome of what the gem should be. I think it was the culmination of a lifetime of experience up to this point. And I don't see myself upgrading again, as I consider it an heirloom piece. I also don't see my budget ever going beyond what I paid for that stone. I've reached the ceiling! lol Anyway, that's just my 2 beans about buying and learning as you go along.

More great info! Thank you! The clarification about diamonds is helpful confirmation. I always thought everyone having diamonds as engagement rings was just the result of an effective marketing strategy by the diamond cartels, but now I think it may be rather practical! Sturdy stones that are easy to compare with others - not so bad!

I'm glad to hear you were able to sell your original stones. I read that colored stones don't retain resale value very well, but maybe that's incorrect. Sounds like you made your way to an amazing sapphire. Is it set?
 

Venus8

Rough_Rock
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There are several, and I rely on each for different things. For instance, I purchased my current emerald from George Smith (of MuzoEmeralds on Instagram). He's a British ex-pat living in Colombia. So, with him, you go straight to the source. And, yes, he's more of a concierge service than your typical vendor. You tell him what you want, and he finds you options.




I think about this all the time. They are numerous! For instance, when I consider how I used to shop local (not mom & pop either... chain) jewelry stores. Now, that's not always a bad thing. Indeed, at least you get to see the piece in person before committing. But I never even knew to ask about ruby treatments. I was just spending my money on what the sales person told me was top tier. And there are people with enormous budgets doing the same thing! So it's not only a matter of money, but education, as you said. That seems insane to me now, of course. And, IMO, it's best to buy loose stones, as you know exactly what you're paying for, as opposed to accent stones, precious metals, labor, etc. That being said, the smart buyers always seek out information, as you did. As we all did!

Thank you so much for the recommendation of George Smith. I will have to check him out on Instagram. Is he for higher end emeralds? Are Columbian emeralds with good clarity out of my price range right now? If so, I'll keep his name for the future.

I think the moral of the story with almost any shopping is "buyer beware!" I do think your approach of buying loose stones is probably the smartest way to go. The consumer almost never wins with "package deals" or just listening to what the salesperson tells them ...
 

Venus8

Rough_Rock
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^ 100%. It's all a compromise (unless you have no budget).

The more chromium, the more saturated the green. And with that usually comes decreased clarity. This is why Zambian stones, for instance, tend to be less included. They are typically colored by vanadium, as opposed to chromium.

Interesting! Thank you for sharing the reason for the differences in coloring and inclusions!
 

T L

Super_Ideal_Rock
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You might be able to get a slightly included one carat Colombian emerald with minor oil and medium green color for your price range.

Check out JR Colombian Emetalds (they’re located in Florida). They specialize in Colombian material, but George (Muzo emeralds) has the museum worthy stuff. JR had a huge selection though. Just avoid table surface fractures.
 

Venus8

Rough_Rock
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It’s best you see some in person. They are the most unphotogenic gems. When I photograph mine, it’s like photographing a Ferrari, but the photo shows a Yugo. No video or photo can really portray the deep color or metallic sheen these stones have. If green metallic satin was three dimensional, and transparent, that’s the best way I can describe them. The pale stones and some others can be more flat in color.

Haha! The poor Ferrari must feel so insulted by the photo! I'm now completely convinced I have to do in-person research. What a beautiful description of an emerald's color. And a good warning about others being flat ... Thank you for more helpful advice!
 
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Venus8

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You might be able to get a slightly included one carat Colombian emerald with minor oil and medium green color for your price range.

Check out JR Colombian Emetalds (they’re located in Florida). They specialize in Colombian material, but George (Muzo emeralds) has the museum worthy stuff. JR had a huge selection though. Just avoid table surface fractures.

Great, thank you so much! Do Colombian emeralds hold value better than Zambian emeralds?
 

Venus8

Rough_Rock
Joined
Jul 16, 2022
Messages
34
There is a combination of chromium, vanadium and iron in all emeralds, but the main coloring agent in Colombian stones is chromium, and Vanadium in Zambian. Colombian stones have the least amount of iron. The chromium, and low iron, gives the Colombian stone amazing color, but unfortunately it messes with the crystal lattice of beryl (the mineral that makes up emerald), hence the inclusions.

I do not recommend looking at George’s Muzo Instagram because you will forever be in lust and turn into the Gollum version of “Lord of the Emeralds.” Lol!

However, the great thing about emeralds is that you can find beautiful stones for a decent price. They do not have to be top Muzo quality like the stones in George’s Instagram.

Yes, there is always that danger! When the budget says, "preowned Lexus" and you spend too much time at the Bentley dealership, it leads to problems! :lol: It's very soothing to know there is hope for a beautiful emerald for those of us without an unlimited budget! Thank you for that reassurance. And thank you for the additional chemistry info - very informative!
 

T L

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Sep 20, 2008
Messages
24,824
Great, thank you so much! Do Colombian emeralds hold value better than Zambian emeralds?

I don’t recommend buying emeralds as an investment, and Zambia, as well as other areas do produce gemmy beautiful stones, but whenever you hear about a fine stone going up for auction, or a famous emerald, it’s always Colombian.
 

Venus8

Rough_Rock
Joined
Jul 16, 2022
Messages
34
I don’t recommend buying emeralds as an investment, and Zambia, as well as other areas do produce gemmy beautiful stones, but whenever you hear about a fine stone going up for auction, or a famous emerald, it’s always Colombian.

Great, more helpful info! This purchase is personal, but I guess after reading Autumn in New England's story of buying and then realizing something else would be better (and subsequent selling), it occurred to me that maybe I should consider resale value. But ideally I just want to buy a stone that I will love for the rest of my life.
 

T L

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Sep 20, 2008
Messages
24,824
Great, more helpful info! This purchase is personal, but I guess after reading Autumn in New England's story of buying and then realizing something else would be better (and subsequent selling), it occurred to me that maybe I should consider resale value. But ideally I just want to buy a stone that I will love for the rest of my life.

Or an heirloom piece. The investment quality material is pure, transparent, no enhancement stones with an effect called “Gote De Aceite,” which translates to “Drop of oil.” These particular emeralds have an oil like appearance from the inside, and the light flutters through them like “butterfly wings” along the back facets. This is only found in Colombian material, and the best of the best, meaning the Muzo mine in Colombia (there are three mines in that country). The color is a medium dark green. They are extraordinarily expensive per carat, and if untreated $$$$$$$$$. Those are the stones that are investment quality.

Otherwise, if not looking for top quality, just make sure you see them in person, get minor enhancement, no table surface fractures, reputable independent lab report, and pay a fair price for the origin, carat weight, and color.
 
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