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Is a pierced diamond structurally unsound?

frogplus

Brilliant_Rock
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Jul 27, 2018
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511
Just in general is it definitely more likely to shatter or crack if it gets hit, if it has a hole drilled into it and not filled?
 

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Texas Leaguer

Ideal_Rock
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Jul 27, 2009
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Just in general is it definitely more likely to shatter or crack if it gets hit, if it has a hole drilled into it and not filled?
Yes, in general it is definitely more likely to sustain additional damage with the right impact. However, diamonds are quite durable in general, so you may never have a problem. Especially if worn as a pendant.
 

whatamilookingat

Rough_Rock
Joined
Jan 7, 2019
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31
I would think that it would be more likely to crack. Even if it never got damaged, wouldn't the performance be impacted? Especially since I assume it'll have something going through that hole in order to make it wearable. Is that why it has a hole drilled into it? I'm not sure, but it seems like that would reflect all throughout the diamond.
 
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sledge

Ideal_Rock
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Apr 23, 2018
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Is there a specific reason why you are considering such a stone? It seems there are ample diamonds without such defects.

In addition to structural concerns, I would also be concerned with the drilled (but not filled) section become a home for dirt, grime, etc therefore creating transparency/cleaning issues.
 

kenny

Super_Ideal_Rock
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27,056
Any sample of material is stronger when solid than another sample of the same material with the same dimensions that is fractured, cracked, or has holes drilled through it.

Basic physics.

That's why I am leery of diamonds with cracks, aka feathers.
I didn't say I would never buy one.
I said leery.
I'd look into the severity of the feather and its location and consider how I planned to set it.
 
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ringo865

Ideal_Rock
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Feb 14, 2014
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Some diamonds are pierced/drilled on purpose, and not necessarily to remove crystals. For example briolette cuts are commonly drilled so they can thread the hanging device thru it.
5F25B8E8-3E6D-448A-8D23-A5AFC0BBDD59.jpeg

Is that what you’re talking about?
 

elizat

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Mar 23, 2013
Messages
1,072
I have been following your other thread but haven't posted. Is this still contemplating the 1 carat pierced Lightbox in a ring? I definitely would not do that. Unless you bezel the heck out of it- and I'd still worry that the setting process may be an issue with that.
 

frogplus

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Jul 27, 2018
Messages
511
Some diamonds are pierced/drilled on purpose, and not necessarily to remove crystals. For example briolette cuts are commonly drilled so they can thread the hanging device thru it.
5F25B8E8-3E6D-448A-8D23-A5AFC0BBDD59.jpeg

Is that what you’re talking about?
Yep

I have been following your other thread but haven't posted. Is this still contemplating the 1 carat pierced Lightbox in a ring? I definitely would not do that. Unless you bezel the heck out of it- and I'd still worry that the setting process may be an issue with that.
The question is really a general question about any diamond. I've basically written that one off as a bad idea for my purposes but the question was inspired by that necklace setting style.
 

sledge

Ideal_Rock
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From an engineering standpoint, anytime you drill a hole in an object you (strucurally) weaken it. Once you determine the size (diameter) of the hole needed, pull out strengths, etc you can then determine how close to the edge you can place that hole without making it structurally unsound.

This general practice is used in practically all things built. Something as simple as your ceiling or roof joists in your home are especially critical and sensitive to such things.

Same deal. Go outside and dig a hole. Depending on soil types, sizes, depths, etc you will start to see the hole slough off or potentially cave in.

When doing drilled shafts of real size and depth for bridge construction, we normally use a double cased method where you place a larger heavy steel casing to support the earth that is about 6-12" larger than the designed hole. Then we place a permanent corrugated metal casing in the hole and slightly embed into the rock socket. Most shafts have a minimum 10-15' embedment into rock, whereas this casing may extend 1-3'. Once the CMP is placed, we then install a reinforcing cage and will then pour the entire hole with concrete. Once poured out, we use a crane to lift the outer temporary steel casing and then move on and repeat the process for however many piers the job requires.

Once tested and cured, vertical construction of columns, caps, beams and deck with concrete rail occurs and then you can drive your vehicle across the completed bridge.
 
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