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Is a lab yellow diamond available under $1500?

oliverave

Rough_Rock
Joined
Dec 22, 2019
Messages
7
Hi PSers! I hope I'm doing this right. My first post asking for advice. I love love love yellow diamonds but I have a teeny budget. I'm hoping to ideally spend no more than $1000 on a yellow diamond. I'm hoping for 1 carat but realize I need to be reasonable and I'll settle for anything between .75 and 1 carat. My top cuts are marquis and pear, but I'm willing to settle for an elongated cushion, radiant cut, or round if that's my last choice. If needed I can spend up to $1500. I know nothing about diamonds, I just buy moissanites so this is all new to me. I hope I can find a stone for this price but I realize this might not be feasible.
 

Ada Diamonds CEO

Rough_Rock
Trade
Joined
Jan 8, 2020
Messages
27
Yellow lab diamonds grow in different shapes than colorless lab diamonds, so you'll see many more radiants, princess, and cushions than marquise, pear, or round.

Also, I recommend that you see the stone in person before buying it, as yellow lab diamonds have very different coloring than yellow mined diamonds.

Why? The atomic structure is quite different. Natural yellow diamonds are normally type Ia, with aggregated nitrogen clusters in the crystal, where as lab grown yellows are type Ib, with single nitrogen atoms. Single nitrogen defects change the light absorption differently than clustered nitrogen, and the resulting diamonds are more orangey or brownish yellow than pastel / canary yellow.
 

oliverave

Rough_Rock
Joined
Dec 22, 2019
Messages
7
Yellow lab diamonds grow in different shapes than colorless lab diamonds, so you'll see many more radiants, princess, and cushions than marquise, pear, or round.

Also, I recommend that you see the stone in person before buying it, as yellow lab diamonds have very different coloring than yellow mined diamonds.

Why? The atomic structure is quite different. Natural yellow diamonds are normally type Ia, with aggregated nitrogen clusters in the crystal, where as lab grown yellows are type Ib, with single nitrogen atoms. Single nitrogen defects change the light absorption differently than clustered nitrogen, and the resulting diamonds are more orangey or brownish yellow than pastel / canary yellow.
Thank you! I have a local jeweler who works with lab stones but I wanted to have some idea if it was possible before I talked with them or if I should save up more money first. I might do a 3 stone ring with yellow diamonds as the side stones. I saw Brilliant Earth had a whole bunch but I don't really want to work with them.
 

Demon

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Feb 16, 2009
Messages
570
Yellow lab diamonds grow in different shapes than colorless lab diamonds, so you'll see many more radiants, princess, and cushions than marquise, pear, or round.

Also, I recommend that you see the stone in person before buying it, as yellow lab diamonds have very different coloring than yellow mined diamonds.

Why? The atomic structure is quite different. Natural yellow diamonds are normally type Ia, with aggregated nitrogen clusters in the crystal, where as lab grown yellows are type Ib, with single nitrogen atoms. Single nitrogen defects change the light absorption differently than clustered nitrogen, and the resulting diamonds are more orangey or brownish yellow than pastel / canary yellow.
Oh, maybe you can answer a couple of questions I have?

Do any blue lab diamonds fluoresce red? Any other color of fluorescence?

And do other colored lab diamonds fluoresce any color other than blue?
 

sprinklesparkles

Rough_Rock
Joined
Jan 6, 2020
Messages
16
Yellow lab diamonds grow in different shapes than colorless lab diamonds, so you'll see many more radiants, princess, and cushions than marquise, pear, or round.

Also, I recommend that you see the stone in person before buying it, as yellow lab diamonds have very different coloring than yellow mined diamonds.

Why? The atomic structure is quite different. Natural yellow diamonds are normally type Ia, with aggregated nitrogen clusters in the crystal, where as lab grown yellows are type Ib, with single nitrogen atoms. Single nitrogen defects change the light absorption differently than clustered nitrogen, and the resulting diamonds are more orangey or brownish yellow than pastel / canary yellow.
This is so interesting! Is this why lab emeralds, rubies, sapphires, etc. tend to have a different hue and saturation than naturally mined ones?
 

MelloYello8

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jul 6, 2018
Messages
151
The price per carat you’re seeking is really more in the range sold by lightbox and few places are selling stones of any color for that low. Unfortunately lightbox does not sell yellow diamonds. If you aren’t wedded to it being a lab diamond, you might consider earth mined diamonds at Parks Fine Jewelry. He often posts very competitively priced fancy light yellows on his Instagram and will make yellow gold cups to bring out the color.
 

Ada Diamonds CEO

Rough_Rock
Trade
Joined
Jan 8, 2020
Messages
27
Do any blue lab diamonds fluoresce red? Any other color of fluorescence?

And do other colored lab diamonds fluoresce any color other than blue?
Most of the as-grown blues I've seen don't have significant fluorescence in longwave UV, but most will phosphoresce either chalky orange or chalky whitish blue after UV exposure.

With shortwave UV (requires safety glasses!) there can be yellowish/brownish fluorescence.

Prettymuch all pink/red lab diamonds will have a very strong orange fluorescence. Those diamonds can be used as quantum sensors to detect magnetic fields:


This is so interesting! Is this why lab emeralds, rubies, sapphires, etc. tend to have a different hue and saturation than naturally mined ones?
Admittedly, I know far more about diamonds than I do about other gemstones; however, I'll say this: in most gemstones, it's the impurities that define the gemstone, and those defects are often geographical in nature. IE Burmese Rubies, Colombian Emeralds, Ceylon Sapphires, Montana Sapphires, etc.

In diamonds, it's different - the higher purity the crystal, the better the color and the more desirable the diamond, regardless of origin (Ignoring fancy colored diamonds, of course).

Also, it's worth noting that the atomic structure of diamonds versus other gemstones. Diamond is a crystal of one atom: carbon. Virtually all other gemstones are made of fairly complicated molecules:

Gemstone NameChemical Formula of GemstoneNumber of Elements in GemstoneNumber of Atoms per Molecule
DiamondC11
SapphireAl2O325
EmeraldBe3Al2 (SiO3) 6429
AlexandriteAl2BeO437
TopazAl2SiO4(F,OH)2513
TurquoiseAl6(PO4)4(OH)84H2O446
TourmalineNa3Li3Al6(BO3)3(SiO3)6F4752
 

OoohShiny

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 25, 2014
Messages
6,852
Most of the as-grown blues I've seen don't have significant fluorescence in longwave UV, but most will phosphoresce either chalky orange or chalky whitish blue after UV exposure.

With shortwave UV (requires safety glasses!) there can be yellowish/brownish fluorescence.

Prettymuch all pink/red lab diamonds will have a very strong orange fluorescence. Those diamonds can be used as quantum sensors to detect magnetic fields:




Admittedly, I know far more about diamonds than I do about other gemstones; however, I'll say this: in most gemstones, it's the impurities that define the gemstone, and those defects are often geographical in nature. IE Burmese Rubies, Colombian Emeralds, Ceylon Sapphires, Montana Sapphires, etc.

In diamonds, it's different - the higher purity the crystal, the better the color and the more desirable the diamond, regardless of origin (Ignoring fancy colored diamonds, of course).

Also, it's worth noting that the atomic structure of diamonds versus other gemstones. Diamond is a crystal of one atom: carbon. Virtually all other gemstones are made of fairly complicated molecules:

Gemstone NameChemical Formula of GemstoneNumber of Elements in GemstoneNumber of Atoms per Molecule
DiamondC11
SapphireAl2O325
EmeraldBe3Al2 (SiO3) 6429
AlexandriteAl2BeO437
TopazAl2SiO4(F,OH)2513
TurquoiseAl6(PO4)4(OH)84H2O446
TourmalineNa3Li3Al6(BO3)3(SiO3)6F4752
That video makes my brain hurt :shock: lol
 

MelloYello8

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jul 6, 2018
Messages
151
Hey thought I’d share this find — .93 fancy intense yellow ideal cut round. It’s just over the top of budget with the 10% discount that pops up. It’s an I1 but since it’s yellow maybe the bigger inclusions blend in. Maybe it’s the lighting in the one photo but this shade of yellow isn’t my taste. Unfortunately I have no experience purchasing from this store but I do like that it produces all its own diamonds in the USA.

 

Marriedbuteloped

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Feb 5, 2019
Messages
131
So cool what has been shared so far! Makes me want to study physics and chemistry!

@oliverave Maybe you can wait a while and see what Swarovski will launch later on this year. There is an article in this forum or you can just google it. I assume they are in the same price range as Lightbox.

If there is one thing I learned watching the mmd development over the years: It's worth the wait. They eventually invent and produce what the consumers want. And that they have amazing marketing because it might just be the other way around :)
 

oliverave

Rough_Rock
Joined
Dec 22, 2019
Messages
7
Hey thought I’d share this find — .93 fancy intense yellow ideal cut round. It’s just over the top of budget with the 10% discount that pops up. It’s an I1 but since it’s yellow maybe the bigger inclusions blend in. Maybe it’s the lighting in the one photo but this shade of yellow isn’t my taste. Unfortunately I have no experience purchasing from this store but I do like that it produces all its own diamonds in the USA.

That's gorgeous! I really don't want to support De Beers and I've read that their Lightbox diamonds are horribly cut and some other shady things so they're out too.

@Marriedbuteloped I just saw that Swarovski information! I've read a couple articles by now. I love all the colors so maybe I'll get more than one.
 

OoohShiny

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 25, 2014
Messages
6,852
That's gorgeous! I really don't want to support De Beers and I've read that their Lightbox diamonds are horribly cut and some other shady things so they're out too.
May I ask where you have read these things?

De Beers is no saint, I'm sure, much as any big business is no saint :lol: but their LB diamonds do fairly well in terms of light return - they certainly aren't 'horribly cut', from what I can tell.

Check out the Lightbox thread and the SMTB thread for some pictures :)


 

oliverave

Rough_Rock
Joined
Dec 22, 2019
Messages
7
May I ask where you have read these things?

De Beers is no saint, I'm sure, much as any big business is no saint :lol: but their LB diamonds do fairly well in terms of light return - they certainly aren't 'horribly cut', from what I can tell.

Check out the Lightbox thread and the SMTB thread for some pictures :)


Who knows at this point, I've been reading a few different articles on them. I might be misremembering too. I've decided to just keep saving and saving for my perfect stone rather than settling for something.
 
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