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Help Identify Ring

Discussion in 'Antique and Vintage Jewelry' started by Wan, Aug 14, 2019.

  1. Wan
    Rough_Rock

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    by Wan » Aug 14, 2019
    I received this ring from a family member, who received it from her late husband. Its origin is unknown to her. I have a copy of the last appraisal for it from 1982, which reads:

    14k W.G. ring set with one older brilliant cut diamond .28cts, four single cut diamonds .02cts each, and ten single cut diamonds .01cts each. Clarity grade of large diamond VS1, color H-I.

    I'm curious if anyone can place it (time, maker, etc.). There are two marks on the inside of the band; a long script on the top and a single mark on the bottom - based on the direction of the photo. I'm not sure if the photo I took made them upside down or not.

    20190814_095559.jpg 20190814_095646.jpg 20190814_095319.jpg
    20190814_095206.jpg . 20190814_100509.jpg
     
    


    


  2. meely
    Brilliant_Rock

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    by meely » Aug 14, 2019
    That textured gold is very 1970s to my eye.
    I would hazard a guess that the word says Craven, the maker perhaps?
     
    VRBeauty likes this.
  3. Wan
    Rough_Rock

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    by Wan » Aug 14, 2019
    Craven is a a good guess! I wasn't able to find anything on a maker with that name using Google though, but that could be on me since I'm new to this type of research. I've attached a photo where I think the mark is a little more clear... again, I'm assuming I have it right side up!
    20190814_103823.jpg
     
  4. meely
    Brilliant_Rock

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    by meely » Aug 14, 2019
    Yeah I had a google too and couldn’t see anything I’m not too familiar with searching for US makers though, perhaps someone else better informed will know.
     
    


    


  5. VRBeauty
    Super_Ideal_Rock

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    by VRBeauty » Aug 15, 2019
    My first thought was 80’s based on the bold styling, Since your1982 appraisal refers to the diamond as being an older brilliant older cut, perhaps the diamond was re-used from an earlier piece? I could see that suite of diamonds being used in an older engagement ring. If that’s the case, the stamp probably reflects the local jeweler who made the new setting.

    This is mere speculation, but... the bottom of the three bands also has an interesting wear pattern - it shows wear on both edges of the band, not what you’d expect in a fixed three-band arrangement like that. Maybe that band was also part of the original ring?
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2019
  6. Wan
    Rough_Rock

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    by Wan » Aug 15, 2019
    I think you are making some good speculations. Older diamonds on a newer ring is certainly plausible. If it was made by a local jeweler that'll make finding its origin a needle in a haystack. I've never seen another design quite like it. Possibly custom designed/made? And that is an interesting point you make about the wear on the bands. Sure makes me think!

    I'm hoping more people toss in their best ideas here - until then, so many mysteries will prevail!
     
  7. VRBeauty
    Super_Ideal_Rock

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    by VRBeauty » Aug 15, 2019
    This is my final speculation... LOL.

    Your ring was made from a woman’s wedding set, probably 1950’s era. Both bands were used; they were incorporated in the outer bands of the new ring, with new gold somehow wrapped 3/4 of the way around the old bands to form the more substantial and geometrically shaped bands that make up the new shank. (If you look closely at the inside edge of the top band, there’s a “chip” which may - MAY - be part of the new gold cladding breaking away from the old gold band. One possible explanation for what would otherwise be a very unusual wear pattern.) The center band is new to this setting. The “Craven” mark, parts of which can be seen on both outer bands, is part of the original setting. The center “platform” on the bottom was used in part because the original bands would have been much too small to fit the wearer of the new ring.
     

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