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Frustrating appraisal experience

Discussion in 'RockyTalky' started by newlyengaged11, Dec 9, 2005.

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  1. newlyengaged11
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    by newlyengaged11 » Dec 9, 2005
    Hi all,

    I just had my engagement ring appraised, and was very disappointed with the experience. [​IMG] Now I am concerned that the appraisal is not worth much - I don''t trust it. I''d like to tell you a bit about in hopes of getting feedback as to whether I should be worried.

    Here''s how it went:

    - What I am most upset about is this: I asked him to make sure the prongs were okay and the stones secure, and he said they were. BUT, when I got home, I examined the ring closely myself because I didn’t at all trust his evaluation. It turns out that one of the side diamonds is loose!!![​IMG] I discovered this by shaking the ring and hearing the tiny rattle. Upon further examination, I found that I could actually move the side diamond around ever so slightly. (By the way, there is no way that the stone got loose on the way home, as it was in its box - I wasn''t wearing it.)

    - Also, the setting was custom made, and while looking at it in his office, I thought I noticed that the side diamonds were not exactly aligned (one was a tiny bit too high). I pointed this out to him, and he said yes, that I should consider having this adjusted with my jeweler. Well, I''m glad I caught this, but shouldn''t he be pointing this out to me rather than vice versa?

    - The phone rang throughout the entire appraisal session (about 45 minutes, give or take), and he picked it up and spoke (for extended lengths of time) at least four times. Not professional!!

    - He measured the side stones, and put in the length measurement for both the length and width, and then couldn’t figure out why the carat weight was over what our jeweler said it would be (it’s because these were ovals – not rounds).

    - I asked him about what "Platinum 950" meant, and what possible alloys could be added to it, and he said that Platinum 950 meant that there was at least 95% plantinum, and that Platinum 900 has 10% iridium. But this doesn''t answer my question of what various metals could be added to Platinum 950 - is it always iridium??

    - I was told that he couldn’t do any form of light analysis (e.g., Idealscope, etc.) on a set diamond – is this true?

    - He first said he was going to plot the inclusions and make sure the diamond was the same one we had paid for. He did go through the inclusions, but never even bothered to look at the certificate to verify they were the same as he was seeing. Is this how it is supposed to work?

    - Basically, the appraisal consisted of him telling us he thought the diamond was colorless (D, E, or F), and then asked what GIA said – we said F; he said it could be VS1 or 2, we said GIA graded it VS2; he said symmetry and polish were very good, we said GIA had graded it good/good. He measured the length and width and depth of the diamonds (approximately).

    - I asked if we could have the crown and pavilion angles written down, as well – this was not done.

    - It seemed as though he merely played with the numbers until we told him that he had arrived at an appraisal value we were happy with – is that how an appraisal is supposed to work?

    - Then, toward the end of the session, he asked if we minded if his friend came in (to the tiny, cramped office). Well, we can’t say “no” can we, without looking rude?

    - Then, when it came time to pay, his credit card machine wasn’t working, so we had to give him all the cash we had, and he asked us to send him a check for the rest!

    - I guess I had just hoped that the appraisal would be an interesting, informative experience and leave me feeling secure about my purchase. It did no such thing.

    - I chose this appraiser because he came highly recommended on PriceScope. He was very nice, and I feel really bad giving him such an awful review, but I feel truly disappointed by this service. I also chose this appraiser because his cost was about $60 less than the other appraiser I was considering. Is this a case of just getting what you paid for? What is the norm when it comes to appraisal sessions? Should I have my ring reappraised?

    Sigh . . . I''ve been looking forward to having this ring in my hands for many months now. And now I don''t think I should wear around if the side stone is even a tiny bit loose, right?

    Thanks for reading, and I''d appreciate any advice.


     
    


    


  2. windowshopper
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    by windowshopper » Dec 9, 2005
    i hope to tell us who this rude bozo is? so we can avoid him/her
     
  3. newlyengaged11
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    by newlyengaged11 » Dec 9, 2005
    I have some reservations about revealing his name on this forum - he was very nice, and based on his great reviews on this site, it makes me think (hopefully) that this may have been an isolated case. Perhaps he was distracted by something, who knows - we all have bad days, right? I definitely don't think that justifies how the appraisal went (particularly the part about not noticing a loose stone!), but . . . I'm trying not to get too worked up and upset over this (not much success so far on that).
     
  4. Richard Sherwood
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    by Richard Sherwood » Dec 9, 2005
    Bummer. Sorry for your experience.

    How much did he charge? I do all the things you mentioned you wanted, but I charge $175 up to 2 carats and spend a couple hours on it. Was his fee substantially less?
     
    


    


  5. Kaleigh
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    by Kaleigh » Dec 9, 2005
    I would call him and tell him why you are displeased. He''ll never know, unless you tell him. Could have been distracted from what you said, hard to say. But I would call and be honest with him. Really.[​IMG]
     
  6. newlyengaged11
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    by newlyengaged11 » Dec 9, 2005
    The fee was $150 for an engagement ring with a center diamond slightly under 2 carats and side diamonds totalling around 80 points. However, since his credit card machine wasn't working, we gave him around $104 in cash (all we had), with the agreement that we'd send a check for the rest. I'm tempted to write him and email and say I don't think I should have to pay at all!

    Kaleigh, you are totally right - I do need to call him. And I will. I just really need to (1) vent about this, (2) gauge people's reactions to this appraisal and try to figure out how it SHOULD HAVE GONE (because I really don't know what is reasonable to expect . . .), and (3) ask what people recommend I do going forward . . .
     
  7. Kaleigh
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    by Kaleigh » Dec 9, 2005
    Richard,
    Is it possible for her to get the appraisal re done, or is that out of the question?? Sad that it wasn''t done properly.
     
  8. Rhino
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    by Rhino » Dec 9, 2005
    Sorry to hear about this ne. Where are you from? Perhaps other appraisers or professionals here can recommend another option to you.
     
  9. Richard Sherwood
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    by Richard Sherwood » Dec 9, 2005
    I would have charged $225 to do that ring, so you did save some money with him.

    It''s a good illustration on why it''s important to check beforehand to see what information an appraiser supplies. There''s a very wide variation on information supplied and fees charged.
     
  10. Gonzodogg
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    by Gonzodogg » Dec 9, 2005
    If you do end up going somewhere else, I would make sure you walk in with a checklist and don''t walk out until all of your questions have been answered.

    my .02
     
    


    


  11. Rhino
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    by Rhino » Dec 9, 2005
    What''s up my bro? Long time no talk man. Burnin the oil too eh? I''m about to z out but thought I''d say hi. [​IMG]
     
  12. newlyengaged11
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    by newlyengaged11 » Dec 9, 2005

    Thanks to everyone for your support.



    I''m in NYC. The purpose of this appraisal was for insurance. The appraisal value that was arrived at (basically the number we wanted) was a bit above the purchase price. My fiance really just wanted the appraisal because our insurer required it. I was looking forward to the appraisal to learn more about the stone and to be further educated about it, but I don''t think he''ll be too thrilled if I want to spend another $150+ when what he sees as the principle purpose has been accomplished. Also, I really have no reservation in saying that the stone we have is the stone we were given a GIA cert for - I''m not worried about misrepresentation on the part of the seller, which mitigates against getting the ring reappraised.



    Richard, based on the information found on the web (his site) and this site, I believed I would be getting much more extensive information than I actually did (crown and pavillion angles, Ideal-scope image, etc.). Yes, I should have been more persistent in seeking out the information I was looking for, but at the end of the time, he was pretty obviously done with the session - his friend had come into the office, etc.



    Could I get an Idealscope and use it on my (already set) stone? Is there anything else I could do on my own (other than getting the prongs on that side stone tightened, of course)?
     
  13. Richard Sherwood
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    by Richard Sherwood » Dec 9, 2005
    Well, it's tough to say. Like I mentioned, I would have supplied the information she desired, but at a higher cost than he charged. The appraisal he gave her was his norm, at the fee he normally charges.

    That said, if anybody ever told me they were dissatisfied with their appraisal experience, I would go out of my way to try and make them happy. I would just chalk up the extra time to "public relations" expense.

    Supplying crown and pavilion height-depth/angle though is difficult for an appraiser on a mounted stone if he doesn't have the DiamCalc software or a proportion analyzer of some sort. Not all appraisers do.

    Give him a chance to make you happy. He'll probably come through.

    One thing I would mention to him is that you were upset that he took calls while you were paying him for his time. He probably doesn't realize how much that would bother most people. That's what voice mail is for.

    A good businessman takes criticism with a smile and then learns from it, sharpening his p.r. skills and then making more money because of it.
     
  14. Richard Sherwood
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    by Richard Sherwood » Dec 9, 2005
    Newly, you're in luck. You live in the center of the universe, and not too far from Rhino's place (Good Old Gold in Massapequa Park). Just take it down to him and ask him for an IdealScope photo, and then post it on this forum. Garry and a couple of the other guys are really good at figuring out proportions with the DiamCalc from an IdealScope photo (I haven't played with that aspect of the program yet).

    Rhino just sits around most the day reading the newspaper, so I'm sure he won't mind taking the photo for you.

    Hi Rhino
    [​IMG]. I just ran two of your stones through the SAS2000, and it nailed the color dead-on with both certs (1.06 "D" emerald cut and 1.08 "J" round). My clients loved it.
     
  15. newlyengaged11
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    by newlyengaged11 » Dec 9, 2005

    Ha! Though I''m sure Rhino has many better things to be doing than taking pictures of my ring, next time I can get my hands on a car I would love to stop by Good Old Gold.



    Actually, on a side note: based on my extensive reading of the posts on this forum in recent weeks (much to the detriment of my studying) - I have to say that if I were starting this process tomorrow, I think I would have bought through Good Old Gold. My fiance and I bought from a B&M in NYC - this was our first major jewelry purchase, and we needed the comfort of being able to go there and see everything on a regular basis, etc. (and with no car - no L.I.!).

    So, hopefully someday I''ll be calling you up Rhino for our next purchase, but probably not for a while considering the magnitude of this one! [​IMG]

    That''s the problem with this forum - before this engagement ring, I didn''t think AT ALL about diamonds or jewelry, and now I find myself not being able to stop!! Help . . .
     
    


    


  16. Rhino
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    by Rhino » Dec 9, 2005
    Not a prob and appreciate the kind words ne. If you find yourself out this way I''ll be happy to take the shot for ya, that is, as long as I''m not in the middle of a good news article. [​IMG] You kill me Rich. Sad to say but I can''t even remember the last time reading a newspaper. I just watch the tube at night for the latest. [​IMG]

    night night [​IMG]
     
  17. denverappraiser
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    by denverappraiser » Dec 10, 2005
    Newly,

    I’m sorry to hear about your experience. By all means complain to the appraiser and ask them to redo the job. We all have bad days but you were treated poorly and your final report did not contain the information requested. Estimating crown and pavilion angles on mounted stones requires a bit more work and has somewhat less reliability than the techniques on loose stones but he can do pretty well with DiamCalc and some careful photography. Same thing with the IS photo. It’s nuts that you should have to drive out to Rhino, a competitive seller, to get a picture taken when that was one of your original requirements in the appraisal and that you want to use as part of your analysis. Again, it's not that hard.

    You should get the stone tightened immediately. Allowing the stone to rattle around can quickly damage the prongs and the whole problem gets worse. The original jeweler should be happy to help you with this and it should be free of charge.


    NYC is not the cheapest place to get much of anything done but, for whatever it’s worth, I’m cheaper than that out here in fly-over country.


    If it doesn’t contain the information that you needed and you don’t trust what information it contains, your right, it’s not worth much.


    Neil Beaty
    GG(GIA) ISA NAJA
    Professional Appraisals in Denver
     
  18. Regular Guy
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    by Regular Guy » Dec 10, 2005
    It may present an experience of pretentiousness to walk into an appraiser's office with a checklist. That they've set up an office, with the shingle, calling themselves an: appraiser, suggests to us that they're ready to go. And, yet, particularly readers on Pricescope do have a set of expectations, rightly or wrongly, when they walk in. But, if you make an appointment with your doctor, likewise, you may be somewhat reluctant to walk in, asking if they plan to review some list of things you've heard about.

    Not sure about the procedures here, but....Pricescope has already improved the appraiser landscape leaps and bounds by publishing the range of services offered by independent appraisers (upper right under "Resources"). Also, the news about GIA's presentation of rounded data on their certs suggests the need to me for more, rather than less, able appraiser resources, into the future (and at the same time, in light of Richard's comments here, and wanting to defer to expert insight on the matter, I can understand how it will be possible to competently do the job of an appraiser without necessarily owning very expensive equipment).

    How about the creation of a Pricescope checklist. I don't think it exists yet. But, one where a prospective shopper could ask their appraiser...do you subscribe to the Pricescope checklist? Though they may say to you, sir or mam, I don't know what you're talking about, you could offer them the web site address, and then offer to check back with them after they've read it?

    Just a thought.

    P.S. edited to add...for those sympathetic with this idea, there are at least 2 targeted pieces on Pricescope already that an appraiser could be drawn to in advance of a session, here under Knowledge and here, under FAQs, and although these pieces could create a discussion between you and the appraiser, since they cover a lot of ground, they are more designed to inform the consumer about issues and options, and moreover, they do not seek to pin down the appraiser to an expected standard of markers for routine services expected during that visit. I think this may be helpful, particularly, since -- from my point of view -- appraisers are to diamonds somewhat like the characteristic of the fourth "c" of cut is to diamonds...despite the importance of this characteristic to the core of the value of a diamond, a problem has occurred in the education of the public about it, such that for some consumers and appraisers alike, color and clarity nuances may otherwise become the focus of a visit.
     
  19. denverappraiser
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    by denverappraiser » Dec 10, 2005

    I pretty much agree with this approach with the following two caveats.


    #1. Not all questions are reasonable and not all questions can be answered in as precise a way as you may be hoping. You are certainly entitled to ask anything you wish and if the appraiser isn’t able to provide a straight answer, you are entitled to an explanation of why not. Perhaps they are lacking a required tool, perhaps it will involve additional fees or additional time that you don’t want to agree to. Perhaps it was just a stupid question. In every case, you should walk away from your appraisal with better understanding than when you went in. The purpose of the appraisal is to provide you with useful information and the easiest way for the appraiser to know what is useful to you is for you to ask.


    #2. Many appraisers charge by the hour. Know this going in and choose your questions accordingly.

    I, for one, love it when my clients have put some advance thought into what they want to know and show up with a checklist of specific needs and questions.


    Neil Beaty
    GG(GIA) ISA NAJA
    Professional Appraisals in Denver
     
  20. strmrdr
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    by strmrdr » Dec 10, 2005
    The $ ammount on an appraisal is not the important thing.
    Anyone can take the amount paid add 30% and call it a good amount to insure for with most insurance companies.

    The desciption is what is important, you need every last detail of the ring down in writing to leave the insurance company no wiggle room for replacing it with less than you had. Pictures are always good too.

    Read your appraisal, from the information on it could the ring be remade?

    Thats why having seen Richards reports they are worth $225.
    I dont recall seeing one of Neil''s reports but id be suprised if they didnt contain a lot of information and a photo.

    If you didnt get that level of appraisal then imho they should not be a PS recomended appraiser because they dont do the job they are hired to do.
     
  21. RockDoc
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    by RockDoc » Dec 10, 2005
    I am in agreement with the above, but doing what you wanted is sort of a two step process.


    As to getting light return information, the appraiser needs to have the equipment to do it, not tomention the skill in making sure he conclusions are made as accurately as possible. FURTHER for opinions rendered that are not 100% accurate, the appraiser needs to discuss with you the details of why the LEVEL of the resultant information is what assurance he is providing is.

    Even with the advanced equipment if the result isn''t 100% conclusive, the appraiser who knows what he''s doing should disclose that it is 100% acciurate and conclusive or 80% conclusive etc.

    Done properly, the appraiser should have had the stones loose initially... i.e. the first step, and second step a second examination after the ring was finished to report to you the specifics on how it was constructed and the quality of it.

    If I am required to assess an item gemologically depending on how well I can see things I do tell clients that it is a guess at best. In examining clarity, color and the proportions of the stones used, my experience is that the conclusion of the gradings can be FAR different than seeing them loose.

    As to what alloys are used in 950 platinum - that can only be determined based on the the accuracy of the manufacturer.
    Different manufacturer''s make different blends of allloy used, and it would be necessary for the appraiser to contact the manufacturer of the ring.

    You should note however, that certain services are included in a flat price or per carat price report. Additional services and tests performed by the appraiser, possibly will have extra fees.

    Many of consumers also rely on the fact that a gemologist can appraise or value something. I do know that Dave Atlas, Neil and myself have taken courses in valuation/apprasiing ( which is different from just being a gemologist). Richard as well as myself and Neil are in the process of becoming ICGA, the independent appraiser title issued by the Amercian Gem Society. Cynthia Konney ( New England Gem Lab) is already an ICGA. Marty Haske also has ISA credentials, as do Neil and myself. In assessing the ISA credentials there are courses 101 through 105 and specialty courses too. Learn which ones the appraiser has had.

    There are some other appraisers that also have valuation credentials from the ASA. I know Dave Atlas has taken many of the ASA courses.

    Check the CV of the appraiser that you did "hire" to do your assignment. Does he have the apprasal credentials? Check what instrumentation is used or available, and certainly discuss what the appraiser will do in the assignment you wish.

    Appraise the appraiser, and do it with diligence. The biggest mistake I notice from various consumers is that their preference in selecting an appraiser is based on them being local, and price. While certainly this is a viable cocern, it may result in selecting someone who may not be your best choice.

    Rockdoc
     
  22. Regular Guy
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    by Regular Guy » Dec 10, 2005
    Re the two points above...in part...I think you need to get them talking to each other. Re the latter point...yes...there is a natural motivation for buyers to want to go to someplace local to see the diamond along with their appraiser. This reason may be hard to overstep. However, providing assessment information by which levels of confidence can vary from one set of resources to another could provide a reasoned basis for a shopper to choose to get an assessment globally, not locally.

    Then again, you yourself, Rockdoc, have said that even for rounds, proportion data will only tell 70% of the story. Perhaps a local guy with the correct insight and sensitivity does not have to have the best equipment to help a diamond buyer with a proper assessment.

    With respect to the other related post...the hope is to address issues of sensitivity for evaluating light return information, among other things, so that a shopper can use some sort of criteria to assess those circumstances in which it will be worth their while to bring their rock outside of the "hood."
     
  23. RockDoc
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    by RockDoc » Dec 10, 2005
    Ira wrote:


    Then again, you yourself, Rockdoc, have said that even for rounds, proportion data will only tell 70% of the story. Perhaps a local guy with the correct insight and sensitivity does not have to have the best equipment to help a diamond buyer with a proper assessment.
    With respect to the other related post...the hope is to address issues of sensitivity for evaluating light return information, among other things, so that a shopper can use some sort of criteria to assess those circumstances in which it will be worth their while to bring their rock outside of the "hood."
    Ira Z.
    -------
    I have said this repeatedly - but that is based on the exclusive reliance that a consumer judges how well the stone will return light. Yes the proportional numbers have some bearing, but it isn''t a guarantee of predictability and assurance.

    In fancy cut shapes the accuracy and reliance is much lower.

    There are far more considerations of each stone''s characteristics that come in to play that can seriously vary what an implied prediction of how well the stone will perform that may be overlooked in relying on just the numbers.

    I''ve also written many times about the fickle finger of mother nature being the middle one, which often has a sharp nail on it. Just when you think she is being 100% consistent - she creates the exception to the rule.

    I think you''ve had an academic background and maybe some scientific testing experience based on your posts, so I think you will agree that iniitial testing and study of something can appear conclusive at the time, but later further studies prove there are exceptions.

    Lately I''ve read where coffee is one of the greatest supply of antioxidants in the American diet. A few years ago, there were tons of stuff about how harmful it was.

    Ten years ago we knew what light return was, but couldn''t grade or assess it to the extent that we are able to today, and given some time, we may find out differently than what we believe and know today.

    Maybe we can author something on light return percentage of assuredness based on the method that it is evaluated by the appraiser and what equipment is actually used in evaluating this.

    Sound feasable?

    Rockdoc
     
  24. blitz
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    by blitz » Dec 11, 2005
    Since Leonid took the time to send this "experience" to me, I''ll give it my attention.

    - What I am most upset about is this: I asked him to make sure the prongs were okay and the stones secure, and he said they were... BUT, side diamond was loose!!
    I would want to know if I failed to mention this. And as Neil pointed out, you need to see the jeweler who made the ring, and set the stones, ASAP. Also have jeweler fix the alignment that you have noted as not being exact.

    Never take a call when your with a client.

    - He measured the side stones, and put in the length measurement for both the length and width, and then couldn’t figure out why the carat weight was over what our jeweler said it would be (it’s because these were ovals – not rounds).
    If mounted, record the length x width, and refer to a published application chart of estimated weights. Not clear on this comment.

    - But this doesn''t answer my question of what various metals could be added to Platinum 950 - is it always iridium??
    I had to look up the answer :Copper, Iridium, Ruthenium, Palladium, Cobalt, Gallium, Gold, Indium. But I would of answered the same.

    - I was told that he couldn’t do any form of light analysis (e.g., Idealscope, etc.) on a set diamond – is this true?
    I don’t have any expensive machines, but I do have my eyesight, which is something gemologist used to only rely on. Oh,yes, I do have a $30.00 plastic Idealscope that I find is good to let a client use.

    - He first said he was going to plot the inclusions and make sure the diamond was the same one we had paid for. He did go through the inclusions, but never even bothered to look at the certificate to verify they were the same as he was seeing. Is this how it is supposed to work?
    I check to make sure it matches the grading report, if it does not, I can show the client why I have made that determination.

    Depending on the diamond weight, and the mounting style, I can be limited to call a diamond a firm D,E, or F. And will refer to the grading report.

    I do not record the angles in a mounted stone.

    - It seemed as though he merely played with the numbers until we told him that he had arrived at an appraisal value we were happy with – is that how an appraisal is supposed to work?
    This was not an appraisal. An appraised value, as taught, is a researched value opinion/conclusion based on the market that an item of like, kind and quality is most commonly sold.

    As for fee''s. Most of the people who come to my office are already very well informed and do have some form of question list, which I welcome. They also just want to make sure it matches what the seller has represented, including but not limited to grading reports. If they purchase on-line, they already know the price paid is very good. This I call a consultation and charge $75.00 for ½ hour. If purchased in a jewelry store, and its still a consultation, I will go over a range of numbers. If they want a written appraisal, with a researched value conclusion, then the fee depends on the item.

    I do not print an appraisal on site, but did this appraiser print your "appraisal" while you waited?

    One more thing, if pricescope comes up with a list of questions for the Gemologist/ appraiser, can the Gemologist/appraiser come up with a list of questions to be asked of the on-line seller?
     
  25. DevilsAdvocate
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    by DevilsAdvocate » Dec 11, 2005
    I could not help but share your feelings of disappointment. So many things seemed out-of-sorts there.

    I appreciate that you shared this with other appraisers listed with Pricescope. Sometimes people tend to let their professional services and methods slide. There are some, but not many, individuals who say things one way, but do them differently. Perhaps, these appraisers should not even be in the business. I can''t help but wonder what all the lengthy telephone calls were about-that can be not only annoying, but also distracting to the appraiser''s work.

    You raised some good questions to him and should have received equally good answers.If you feel strong enough about the experience, perhaps you should contact his accrediting organizations so they can help bring him up to par. You would actually be doing him a service. If I left a client disappointed, I would appreciate it that the person let me know.

    Thank you again!
     
  26. pricescope
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    by pricescope » Dec 11, 2005
    Newlyengaged11, thank you very much indeed for sharing your experience and we are very sorry and perturbed by your story. At Pricescope we recommend checking stones and jewelry with independent appraisers and expect them to be knowledgeable, professional and helpful.

    This morning we emailed all the appraisers listed on Pricescope asking them to pay attention to this thread. Some folks already posted here and some replied via emails.

    We hope this discussion will help consumers to be aware of what they should look for when searching for a qualified appraiser.(Thank you, Ira, for starting that check list thread)

    On a side note, would it be reasonable for appraisers to have some sort of "satisfaction guarantee"? [​IMG]
     
  27. NanStacy
    Rough_Rock

    Messages:
    14
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2004
    by NanStacy » Dec 11, 2005
    Newly Engaged,

    Leonid sent your message to all the registered Pricescope appraisers this morning.

    It is always sad to hear about a bad experience with a professional appraiser.

    Some of your expectations may not have been able to be met with a mounted diamond, but that should have been explained to you at the time.

    My colleagues have made many good suggestions. I really don''t have anything to add except this:

    Call the appraiser (who will already be feeling bad since this morning, and may even call you first). Let him make it right for you. You will feel better, and so will he. Everyone has a bad day once in awhile, and I am sure ALL the appraisers registered with Pricescope are thinking about their procedures and client relationships right now!

    All the best,
    Nancy Stacy
     
  28. Garry H (Cut Nut)
    Super_Ideal_Rock
    Trade

    Messages:
    14,569
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2000
  29. geo10000
    Rough_Rock

    Messages:
    38
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2002
    by geo10000 » Dec 11, 2005
    Hello Newly, Leonid passed on this information via e-mail
    this morning, thank you for bringing this situation to
    our attention as appraisers. This is in response to your
    valid concerns and the collective group of jewelry appraisers.

    I think no matter how we may think we would never
    allow this to happen to our clients there are a few
    items in that story that made me rethink some things
    that I do. Our jobs as appraisers are to act as an
    informative liason between the seller (or client) and
    the insurance company/estate etc... We are not
    magicians to come up with exactly what the client
    wants to hear based on what they were told. However,
    we must continue to instill confidence in our client
    by educating and taking time before the appraisal even
    begins to understand what the client expects to
    receive. You would be surprised how just taking a few
    minutes with a client one on one before the apprasial
    even begins greatly helps both parties...it can give
    much needed information on the piece and makes the
    client feel so much better about arriving in an office
    they have never been to.
    In this situation you have brought to my attention of
    putting myself in the clients shoes. I don''t think
    the any of these situations individually in which the
    client brought up was enough to make this person upset
    (or maybe even a few of them). The client even said
    in the beginning of his e-mail that the thing which
    made him most upset was the "rattling of the side
    diamond which the appraiser missed". We tend to
    overlook things but this major problem made this
    person rethink what happened and list a lot of smaller
    concerns that would have been overlooked became
    issures.
    Bottom line here is.....the client comes first!
    Educate them from the beginning before you even look
    at the item. Ask them what they want and expect from
    the appraiser. I was taught 20 years ago that we ask
    what the purpose and function of the appraisal is.
    Give your attention to the client...it''s all about
    them! We make an hourly fee equivalent to a
    lawyer/doctor in some cases...our clients deserve 100%
    attention. I so agree with you...thanks for the
    "wake-up" newly. You don''t know how much this
    post has helped! :)

    George H.


     
  30. Modified Brilliant
    Brilliant_Rock
    Trade

    Messages:
    1,479
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2005
    by Modified Brilliant » Dec 11, 2005
    Hi Newly:
    In response to Leonid''s e-mail request today, I would like to state the following:

    There is never a reason to accept phone calls during an appointment (except in an emergency).
    On the other hand, I have had clients receive phone calls during the appointment...but that''s their choice.
    There is no such thing as a silly or stupid question. Ask any questions that you want!
    All jewelry should always be inspected and cleaned before the appraisal process begins. Stones that are loose in the mounting should be verbally noted to the client.
    Appraisal clients should always be asked what their primary purpose is for their appointment. This should be done when the appointment is made.
    It would be a great idea for an appraiser to ask upon completion, "Did I meet or exceed your expectations today?" That''s giving great customer service!
    Many of us have retail sales/customer service backgrounds...being a good listener helps make the appraisal experience better!
    Just a few thoughts....[​IMG]

    www.metrojewelryappraisers.com
     
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