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EU Referendum: Best night to Buy Kiki!

Jambalaya

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I know we have some fans of Kiki McDonough on the forum. I pointed out a couple of weeks ago that when the EU referendum happens, it will be a favorable time for us to buy because the pound will be weak. I'm not clever enough to figure that out, by the way. I have to confess that I read it somewhere.

With this in mind, I just wanted to point out that the vote is happening, it's looking likely that Britain will leave the EU, and the pound has just fallen eight percent - according to the news, the biggest single fall in its history.

And you know what that means? It's the best night in history to pay for British jewelry in US dollars! :appl:

Go for it!

www.kiki.co.uk
www.patrickmavros.com
www.heavenlynecklaces.com
www.annoushka.co.uk
 

kenny

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BBC now calling the vote for Britain to leave EU!
Partial Snip: "The UK has voted by 52% to 48% to leave the European Union after 43 years in an historic referendum, a BBC forecast suggests."

I was not expecting this.

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-36615028
 

Jambalaya

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No, definitely not.

I blame the French.
 

GK2

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Wow, just wow

Here in the UK we are watching our currency tank with no idea what the future might hold and - for many of us - staring at disbelief at our TV screens reporting a result that will have an impact for decades to come.

But as long as your earrings are cheap...
 

Jambalaya

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But really, it's kinda big. So all those countries who were all together - well, they're still all together, but britain stands small and alone. Like Mighty Mouse.
 

Jambalaya

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GK2|1466744445|4047420 said:
Wow, just wow

Here in the UK we are watching our currency tank with no idea what the future might hold and - for many of us - staring at disbelief at our TV screens reporting a result that will have an impact for decades to come.

But as long as your earrings are cheap...
Pricescoper thinkin' like a Pricescoper! Go hang out on a political website or a news forum if you don't want to read threads that look at things from a jewelry perspective. This is a jewelry website and hunting for bargains is what we do. Start another thread if you want to discuss serious politics. And for your information, I'm not buying anything.
 

chemgirl

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I'm honestly surprised that this didn't get attention here earlier.

DH is British so we stayed up to watch the BBC coverage. His ballot was sent in weeks ago. Bank account was drained just in case.

But just in shock at the results. We were sure enough people would listen to every financial expert out there and vote to stay.

Had so many debates with MIL and her only point for leaving was "it will stop the immigrants from getting our tax dollars". Really? And then Jo Cox was murdered by an extremist. I thought surely people would see that the entire immigration debate was just a front. Apparently not.

Ugh.

I'm sorry for the uncertainty ahead of everyone. This isn't going to be fun.

Jambalaya, I get where you're coming from, it's just that some people are waking up to find out that their retirement is now in question, their finances are up in the air for the foreseeable future. It's a very upsetting night for a lot of people.
 

Jambalaya

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I'm American and I'm not going to clutch my pearls and pretend that something affects me personally when it doesn't. That would be false of me. If I was planning a major purchase I would totally have taken advantage of this night. I would have waited for it, specially, for a long time. Me not spending money wouldn't have helped Britain now. Quite the opposite!

And getting back to the jewelry, instead of the politics of jewelry-buying, jewelers - especially Kiki - have the most horrendous mark-ups, so consumers look for ways to soften the blow. When buying from a foreign country, keeping an eye on the exchange rate is what you do.

Britain has come through much, much worse than this and the other factor is that I work in a profession where everyone around me is dying of cancer. This gives me a long-game perspective on life in general and I see this as another storm that will be weathered, or better... maybe Britain will be free to trade with Asia on its own terms. The only scenario I can think of that would really worry me was if Britain/Europe was facing the kind of enemy it faced in 1939, which obviously isn't the case. The media just loves to whip everyone into a frenzy.
 

MollyMalone

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Jambalaya|1466746151|4047427 said:
I'm American and I'm not going to clutch my pearls and pretend that something affects me personally when it doesn't. * * * Britain has come through much, much worse than this and the other factor is that I work in a profession where everyone around me is dying of cancer. This gives me a long-game perspective on life in general and I see this as another storm that will be weathered. * * *
I just spent an extended Father's Day weekend out in the Midwest with my dad, who is unlikely to live more than several months, and I have a different perspective. Although my parents were generous to my brother and me (e.g., they paid our college and grad school tuitions at private institutions) and to various philanthropies, they were very frugal with themselves. Consequently, my father was able to comfortably afford his move last year into an independent living unit in the best senior community in his area, one that offers a very physically attractive campus, lots of amenities, programs -- and the guarantee of a full continuum of care; his decision did not have to be "driven" by cost considerations. Because I've seen his experience "up close and personal" , it's become even more important to me that I muster a comfortable nest egg for my sunset years, including end-of-life care options that need not be limited to what Medicare and Social Security will cover (assuming those are still in place on down the road).

I'd love to be proven wrong, but I expect that my IRA and 401K investment portfolios will be gravely affected as a result of the Brexit vote. What's happened in the past couple of hours in the US futures markets
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-06-24/tumble-in-u-s-stock-futures-puts-limit-down-trigger-in-reach
http://money.cnn.com/2016/06/24/investing/premarket-stocks-trading/
does not bode well for us Americans either. And there doubtlessly will be an adverse ripple effect throughout the global economy; the fall-out beyond the coming week won't be limited to the UK.

My heart goes out to those living-working in the UK. My portfolios took huge hits in the wake of 9/11 and again after the 2008 economic collapse; those times of financial anxiety for me are still a vivid memory.
 

Trekkie

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chemgirl|1466745229|4047425 said:
I'm honestly surprised that this didn't get attention here earlier.

DH is British so we stayed up to watch the BBC coverage. His ballot was sent in weeks ago. Bank account was drained just in case.

But just in shock at the results. We were sure enough people would listen to every financial expert out there and vote to stay.

Had so many debates with MIL and her only point for leaving was "it will stop the immigrants from getting our tax dollars". Really? And then Jo Cox was murdered by an extremist. I thought surely people would see that the entire immigration debate was just a front. Apparently not.

Ugh.

I'm sorry for the uncertainty ahead of everyone. This isn't going to be fun.

Jambalaya, I get where you're coming from, it's just that some people are waking up to find out that their retirement is now in question, their finances are up in the air for the foreseeable future. It's a very upsetting night for a lot of people.
Yup, even out here in South Africa. My dad is English and gets an English pension. As the situation stands now, what this means for him, in real terms, is that he will be getting +/-R300 less per fortnight. This could get even worse. Fortunately my dad is in a privileged enough position that he is able to withstand this hit (within reason), but our close family friends (who also get an English pension) are wondering if they need to cut their internet (tough, when Skype is their primary method of communication with overseas children and grandchildren) or their satellite TV (SA media is heavily controlled and they're too old to go out much, so this is their only "real" glimpse into the outside world). They're genuinely worried about what they're going to do.

I understand that we're a forum mostly comprising bargain-savvy shoppers but I agree that this was in rather poor taste.
 

Acinom

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Wow Jambalaya.
You have no idea. This will highly impact UK citizens. People are already losing a lot of money (savings and pensions).
And it will highly impact other European countries, the Hong Kong market etc. etc. as the UK is a very important player in the global trade, economic and financial markets.

Enjoy the UK products you can buy at a lower price now... But your posts show an awkwardly bad taste and a complete lack of knowlegde on economic ties... The UK even can lose it's AAA status. Remember the Economic crisis in the States in 2008, followed by the crisis in Europe?
 

missy

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This is terrible. My heart goes out to everyone affected and that includes so many not just those in the UK. Very tumultuous times and I don't know how/when everyone will recover. This is indeed a crisis that is far reaching. :cry:
 

AGBF

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I opened this thread last night and Jambalaya's posting was the only one in the thread. So I actually went to look at the jewelry! But, as some of you who know me know, I follow political events. I am just back from reading everything I could in, "The New York Times" about the vote, and I decided to re-open this thread. I was delighted to see that it had turned into a political discussion (albeit a bit of an acrimonious one). It's about time we discussed this issue!!! As others in this thread have said, this is a matter of huge import globally. It will affect everyone. Britons living abroad who have had the right to work in other European countries may, now, lose those rights. The whole world economy will be affected. I do not think anyone can, yet, predict how far-reaching the effects of this decision will be. I was surprised that David Cameron resigned, although I guess I shouldn't have been. Prime Ministers in parliamentary systems do tend to resign when there is a show of confidence against them. Nonetheless, it was shocking to see first the decision that Great Britain would leave the EU, then the resignation of David Cameron side by side. The latter seemed to punctuate the catastrophic nature of the former.

AGBF
 

Rhea

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chemgirl|1466745229|4047425 said:
I'm honestly surprised that this didn't get attention here earlier.

DH is British so we stayed up to watch the BBC coverage. His ballot was sent in weeks ago. Bank account was drained just in case.

But just in shock at the results. We were sure enough people would listen to every financial expert out there and vote to stay.

Had so many debates with MIL and her only point for leaving was "it will stop the immigrants from getting our tax dollars". Really? And then Jo Cox was murdered by an extremist. I thought surely people would see that the entire immigration debate was just a front. Apparently not.

Ugh.

I'm sorry for the uncertainty ahead of everyone. This isn't going to be fun.

Jambalaya, I get where you're coming from, it's just that some people are waking up to find out that their retirement is now in question, their finances are up in the air for the foreseeable future. It's a very upsetting night for a lot of people.
I want to cry. I'm in my 30s, I work hard and save, and I've just watched a lot of that melt away. It was turned into a vote on immigration (oh, but not my kind of immigration, I'm not really an immigrant :rolleyes: ) with very little concern for what this could actually mean for the financial market, pensions, wages, employment, I could go on. My job in London is partly government paid for and the services we could provide as well as my salary were hit hard by the recession. DH works in England indirectly for a lot of huge multi-nationals which are based in Europe. This will impact us both financially. And no man (or woman) being an island, this effects my spending and as a large group, this effects worldwide spending and impacts the global market and economy.

Don't get me wrong, addressing immigration would be great, but leaving the EU? And now Cameron stepping down? Now who is going to bring us through this crisis, a strong Conservative party leader who wants to leave at all costs? And then there's the fact that Scotland had just decided to stay in the UK in 2014 and is now likely to call another referendum with a vote to leave. It won't be the United Kingdom any longer, in or out of Europe. It'll be England & Wales and perhaps Northern Ireland.

I hate that it was turned into an immigration debate. Yes, immigration is important but to have such blinders on that the vote only mattered in one area. This is all sounding very familiar. As a dual citizen I get to make another decision this Autumn.
 

ksinger

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Rhea|1466764881|4047465 said:
chemgirl|1466745229|4047425 said:
I'm honestly surprised that this didn't get attention here earlier.

DH is British so we stayed up to watch the BBC coverage. His ballot was sent in weeks ago. Bank account was drained just in case.

But just in shock at the results. We were sure enough people would listen to every financial expert out there and vote to stay.

Had so many debates with MIL and her only point for leaving was "it will stop the immigrants from getting our tax dollars". Really? And then Jo Cox was murdered by an extremist. I thought surely people would see that the entire immigration debate was just a front. Apparently not.

Ugh.

I'm sorry for the uncertainty ahead of everyone. This isn't going to be fun.

Jambalaya, I get where you're coming from, it's just that some people are waking up to find out that their retirement is now in question, their finances are up in the air for the foreseeable future. It's a very upsetting night for a lot of people.
I want to cry. I'm in my 30s, I work hard and save, and I've just watched a lot of that melt away. It was turned into a vote on immigration (oh, but not my kind of immigration, I'm not really an immigrant :rolleyes: ) with very little concern for what this could actually mean for the financial market, pensions, wages, employment, I could go on. My job in London is partly government paid for and the services we could provide as well as my salary were hit hard by the recession. DH works in England indirectly for a lot of huge multi-nationals which are based in Europe. This will impact us both financially. And no man (or woman) being an island, this effects my spending and as a large group, this effects worldwide spending and impacts the global market and economy.

Don't get me wrong, addressing immigration would be great, but leaving the EU? And now Cameron stepping down? Now who is going to bring us through this crisis, a strong Conservative party leader who wants to leave at all costs? And then there's the fact that Scotland had just decided to stay in the UK in 2014 and is now likely to call another referendum with a vote to leave. It won't be the United Kingdom any longer, in or out of Europe. It'll be England & Wales and perhaps Northern Ireland.

I hate that it was turned into an immigration debate. Yes, immigration is important but to have such blinders on that the vote only mattered in one area. This is all sounding very familiar. As a dual citizen I get to make another decision this Autumn.
Yeah, clearly the nativist, hyper-nationalist mindset is not unique to the US and is growing in other places. I think you will lose Scotland this time. Voting emotion over common sense, well, we're going to get to witness the results today.

I dread to see the state of our portfolio today. We're not in too many European investments, but the entirety of world markets is going to take a huge hit I expect, and I'm not sure what will bring them back up, because this is just the beginning of the divorce.

I'm sorry you're having to go through this. I'm sorry for all of us. It's like the whole world is pulling in, and getting smaller and meaner somehow. It's depressing.
 

Alex T

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I voted to remain in the EU. This morning I found myself staring at the TV in utter disbelief.

We will weather the storm & come through the otherside, but those waters are going to be rough for a very long time, and without David Cameron to boot?? :nono:

My daughters have a little understanding of what was going on & actually came with me to help me vote, as my polling station was at their school. I had explained to them last week that we were part of a team in Europe, we were friends & we all worked together. So today they asked why would we not want to be part of that team anymore?? I just didn't have an answer....

I'm sure given time things will settle, the economy will recover & our trading will pick up. But right now I really feel like this sucks b*lls....
 

ksinger

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Acinom|1466757881|4047451 said:
Wow Jambalaya.
You have no idea. This will highly impact UK citizens. People are already losing a lot of money (savings and pensions).
And it will highly impact other European countries, the Hong Kong market etc. etc. as the UK is a very important player in the global trade, economic and financial markets.

Enjoy the UK products you can buy at a lower price now... But your posts show an awkwardly bad taste and a complete lack of knowlegde on economic ties... The UK even can lose it's AAA status. Remember the Economic crisis in the States in 2008, followed by the crisis in Europe?
This. Anyone who thinks that "clutching the pearls" is not in order, is flat-out not paying attention. More like, bend over and grab your ass, because this could look a lot like a financial blood bath. The US could come out of it stronger in the end if the EU breaks up, since we will look stronger by comparison (provided of course that Trump doesn't win the xenophobia referendum that our own election has become). The dicey part is how long it takes the instability to shake out. It's going to be a very bumpy ride in the meantime.
 

Jambalaya

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But Trekkie, if you (collective you) want to help the UK economy, then spend money there electronically and buy British products! There really has never been a better time to get your Kiki stuff! And the Mavros purchases help the elephant sanctuary while also helping the British economy. Everyone being terrified to spend is not going to help. I wish I knew more British websites to post, but the only other one I know is the Buckingham Palace gift shop site.

We have our own problems to worry about. I bet Trump is loving all this.
 

Jambalaya

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Oh, don't make out I'm some kind of monster because I suggested the exchange rate was a good time to buy jewelry.

Off to take some candy from babies now.
 

smitcompton

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Hi Jambalya,

I don't see what you posted as any different than these same people telling us they buy diamonds in the US because of currency valuations. We're so cheaphere. Our poor Arkie also complained about the strong dollar.

This is the time to take a trip to England as well as buy Kiki.

The sky is not always falling. The Brits have kept the pound and things will work themselves out. Stop panicking! One thing I know about this forum. Most people don't understand economics at all.


Annette
 

Jambalaya

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Thank you, Annette! While we're on the subject of ethics, the vast majority of diamonds cannot be tracked from their source so we are probably all be wearing conflict diamonds to some extent, even if it's in pave form. But no, in this thread I'm the big bad wolf in a roomful of angels!

Kidding. I've never cared much what others think of me.

You're right - excellent time to take a trip to the UK and prop up the economy. Pity I can't take time off work. But being honest, I would be doing it for myself and not for them. I'm not going to pretend to be more angelic than I am so I can be popular.
 

Jambalaya

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If the rate is still good in another 2-3 weeks, I might buy the Kiki Grace peridot earrings, and possibly some large crocodile earrings from Patrick Mavros. I also like the look of the stuffed corgis in the Buckingham online gift shop, and the green and gold pillbox. Some of the toiletries and cosmetic bags look good, too.

I'm the only one who's even attempting to help. :saint:
 

VRBeauty

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I'm so sorry for those of you in the UK wondering and worrying about the immediate fallout. I'm equally concerned about the long-term international impact - and glad that I don't need to access my any of the (very limited) savings I have invested in the market in the short term.

The Brexit polling had been close enough that I did see this as a possible outcome, even while remaining optimistic that the UK would vote to remain in the EU. But the outcome comes as a shock nonetheless. And it makes me wonder if the US corollary could come to pass... meaning of course could we wake up 3 1/2 months from now facing a Trump presidency?
 

telephone89

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I think this was a really short sighted move by the brits. It also reeks of racist xenophobia, which is disgusting.

I don't think this will be good for Canada either. Apparently we were right in the middle of signing a trade agreement with the EU, of which UK was really pushing. Now that they aren't a part of the EU, people are skeptical if it will actually get pushed through.
 

OoohShiny

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Jambalaya|1466744481|4047421 said:
But really, it's kinda big. So all those countries who were all together - well, they're still all together, but britain stands small and alone. Like Mighty Mouse.
The perception of some that Britain is a small island and is therefore somehow weak on its own amuses me. At one time, half the map of the world was red ;-) and if it is so small and incapable on its own, why has the decision to remove itself from the vice-like grip of the largely-unelected 'powers-that-be' at Brussels had such large economic impacts across the world? :tongue: And why is the generally accepted language of international communication English? :tongue:

Not everyone that voted to leave was voting because they are racist or xenophobic, the UK is not a country of haters - the UK is one of the most culturally diverse nations on the planet, and long may it continue IMHO. Without the large numbers of immigrant workers doing the jobs that the home-grown workers don't want to do, the service industry would struggle and prices for many services would go up. Immigration also brings an interesting variety of opinions, experiences and cultural practices, exposure to which increases awareness of differences in others and increases tolerance of differences in the longer term (at least in those with half a brain - some people are closed-minded idiots, I will concede that).

Many people voted because they are fed up of being dictated to by the EU and bullied into accepting things they don't want. Wanting control of one's own parliament and laws does not seem wrong to me. Would the US allow its laws to be dictated by Canada, for example?

As another example, the EU-machine is seemingly intent on tracking and monitoring its citizens at every opportunity, and is pushing plans to implement vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure data transmission, including using GPS tracking. This issue is largely unknown to most because the EU has deliberately not made a big thing of it and is trying to sneak it in through the back door - such as requiring all vehicles sold from 2018 to have eCall emergency assistance, which contacts the emergency services and gives them your vehicle location and details of the crash you've just had, therefore meaning that it must be constantly monitoring your location. (BMW didn't tell the public this when it advertised "Free Sat Nav in all cars from now on!!" last year IIRC :roll: )

The implementation of this sort of constant monitoring ultimately mean a loss of privacy and the loss of freedom of movement - if they can track you, they can charge you, either with fines for exceeding the speed limit by 1mph, or simply by charging you to use a piece of road at any given time, i.e. Road User Charging. This means that those who are on the lower end of the socio-economic scale ultimately would not be able to afford to travel during the rush hour because the prices would be set high to deter travel at that time, meaning that their quality of life would suffer due to needing to spend longer travelling on cheaper route options or by needing to leave earlier in the morning/later in the evening.

I must admit that I've not read George Orwell's '1984' myself yet but it does seem as if the EU 'powers-that-be' have it as a reference book for their planned future for the EU.


Anyway, I fear this is turning into a political thread and I'm not sure we're allowed to do that? :???: lol

I have no issues with people using currency exchange rate fluctuations to secure a bargain - as has been mentioned earlier in the thread, I'm sure UK companies would rather increase their export business through other countries using it as an opportunity, rather than other countries wringing their hands and saying "poor ol' blighty, they are surely doomed" and holding all their cash 'just in case'. I took advantage of such exchange rate fluctuations myself when I purchased the stone for the other half's ring from the US - buying at £1/$1.70 was a lot less painful than buying at £1/$1.45 or less! and I'm glad I took advantage of that brief peak before it came down again.


Ultimately the world will not end - it is just that things are changing and the period of uncertainty until things are stable is what rocks the markets. If we all fear change then we won't find a way forward quickly or easily. If we embrace change, we can seize opportunities and make the best of things.

In a marriage both partners should be equal - having one dominate the other is unhealthy and anyone worldy-wise would recommend the one being dominated leave for their own development / safety / future health and wellbeing. This is no different - it would be foolish to stay married because it is comfortable, making the break is always difficult but a new life awaits on the other side. The new life is what you make it - don't pity the person making the break, help them onto their feet and on to better things!

:)
 

momhappy

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I've been watching this and it will be interesting to see how it all plays out.
 

Jambalaya

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I read somewhere that only about 5% of Britain's trade is with Asia, due in large part to EU regulations. Is there a silver lining, at all, in that Britain is more free to establish trade links with emerging markets? I have no idea about this - I know nothing about Britain and its trade with Asia, but it's what I read and it seemed to make sense. Just trying to find some positives.

This is only a gut feeling, and a theory, but I wonder if this decision will be such a disaster that Britain will be forced, in the next 2-4 years, to hold another referendum and this time will vote to go back in, and so ultimately - as in, looking five years ahead - everything will be OK. I'm just wondering if that's how it will play out in the long term. I read that Britain was a very strong partner in the EU, so if the country voted to go back in, I can't imagine the EU would say no, but I'd imagine the terms would be harsher than before.

Back in 2009-2010 ish, I also read that the credit crisis in Britain was so bad that half the countries libraries closed, and the domestic trash collections in some areas went down to once every two weeks. This surely can't be as bad as that.

About Britain being -or appearing - small and alone, well isn't that the case, now? When they were alone before - as in, not part of a European Union - it was a completely different world because they had a whole Empire that they were drawing money from, including the huge continent of India!

Without an Empire, and without membership of the European Union, isn't it true that Britain is small and alone? Sorry if that's wrong, it just does seem that way because Britain now has no partners. I guess it's getting a divorce! It's a weird thing to witness. It seems instinctive to me to realize that we live in a global world with global markets, and that trading alone is not a good idea, but the Leavers seem so very sure of their decision. It's confusing.
 

Jambalaya

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Oooh shiney wrote: "Wanting control of one's own parliament and laws does not seem wrong to me. Would the US allow its laws to be dictated by Canada, for example?"

No, we wouldn't want to be dictated to by Canada, that's for sure. But I was under the impression that the EU was a trade arrangement and that better terms can be obtained (with countries outside the EU) when 500 million people negotiate together as a single market than alone. This seems a different thing to me than dictating laws. I thought Britain still made its own laws, mostly, but had entered into EU trade agreements for the economic health of all involved. But I'm hardly an expert and perhaps I'm reading it wrong.
 
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