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DYI ASET (Nerdy Stuff). Ver 2.0

flyingpig

Ideal_Rock
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Nov 7, 2015
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Hi.

I am uploading this for those who want to assess their diamonds bought online without the ASET images or shopping at a B&M and don't want to spend $ on the ASET or IS scopes

There is already a thread about this.
https://www.pricescope.com/community/threads/diy-aset-and-ideal-scope.226126/
The cone shape is the most ideal, but I made it into a cylindrical shape several reasons. The cone shape one is time-consuming. I am not crafty enough and I did not want to use Gr 10 trignometry. Mine took me 5min to make. No need to invest on a loupe. Your smartphone has enough pixel power.

Each cylinder is 3/4 inch in diameter and 2 inch in height. Once assembled, you can just slide the cylinders to create three distinctive zones: 0-45 degree for green, 45-75 for red and 75+ for blue, just like the ASET scope. How do you do this?
To create 0-45 degree green zone, slide the red cylinder until you see a mixture of green and red in the middle (table reflection).
To create 75+ degree blue zone, slide the blue cylinder until you see well defined blue arrows.
The first one is perfect.
The second is almost perfect, except I should have lowered the blue cylinder a bit. Some arrows are redish blue.
The third is too much green. You can see the entirely green table reflection in the middle, and greens around the edges as if it's got painting and digging going on.
The last photo is a bit too much blue (fat arrow heads) and too little green. Notice the entirely red table reflection.


1.jpg 2.jpg
#1 Perfect.png #2 Perfect2.png
#3 too much green.png #4 too much contrast.png
 
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whitewave

Ideal_Rock
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Ok, so what do you put the diamond on and what about lighting?

I can use the ASET wink sent me with my originial engagement stone (this will be interesting and will explain a lot I'll bet)
 

flyingpig

Ideal_Rock
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Good question.
I just did not have tools to create even direct backlighting and stablize my ring.

For photography, I secured the ring on a piece of styrofoam, slightly elevated. I shined the styrofoam which reflects white light. This was my pseudo backlight. Because the back lighting is weak, it is very greeny in all photos because of the green cylinder.
I 20170920_170337.jpg
 

gm89uk

Brilliant_Rock
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Hi flyingpig, I will share my modification of this that I made before (with cylinders). It does have basic trig that tells you the height of each cylinder based on your desired diameter. Nothing an excel formula can't streamline and simplify for userfriendliness. I also didn't use a blue cylinder, just a blue circle on top after 75 degrees.

I love your lateral thinking of using the table reflection to estimate and calibrate 45.75 degrees .

Unfortunately I chucked mine when I got an ASET scope for 15 dollars direct from AGS.

I ripped a small linear line in a tissue and put the diamond through. Then with some tension on the tissue (with tape pulling it on either end) the ring is suspended. I used my laptop white background screen below the tissue as a platform and it worked great.

I'll try share later
 

whitewave

Ideal_Rock
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IMG_1973.JPG

I have to say this isn't nearly as bad as I thought it would be for a 1993 uncertified H very strong fluro I1 stone.

I need another person to help with the asscher. It is unwieldy and I need another set of hands to get a pic...
 

Wink

Ideal_Rock
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Nice whitewave. I suspect that you might be a little high above the diamond which is affecting the image also. Try to see if you can get the bottom of the hand held ASET to be approximately level with the diamond.

Your diamond is showing a LOT of leakage around the edge of the diamond, but I am wondering if there is really that much.

Wink
 

flyingpig

Ideal_Rock
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Your diamond is showing a LOT of leakage around the edge of the diamond, but I am wondering if there is really that much.
Wink
Triangular blatant leakage next to the arrowheads is normal. But the marquise shaped glassiness around the edges is unusual. Maybe the metal setting is reflecting strong light onto the girdle and pavilion from the side??In the areas which appear to be leakage, there actually is green and red. I could be wrong though.
 
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whitewave

Ideal_Rock
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Nice whitewave. I suspect that you might be a little high above the diamond which is affecting the image also. Try to see if you can get the bottom of the hand held ASET to be approximately level with the diamond.

Your diamond is showing a LOT of leakage around the edge of the diamond, but I am wondering if there is really that much.

Wink
@flyingpig

Ok. I have a better shot... used my iPad screen this time.
IMG_1997.JPG
You know, this is how it was done in 1993-- you trusted the jeweler to use his experience and eyes to pick out a pretty diamond.

Now, the asscher is a PITA. I can't get it straight and made a little low set holder etc.

This is the best I can do for it... I find the ring setting unwieldy. You can see the ring is crooked.
IMG_2003.JPG

That is the one I bought blind and by the numbers :lol:

Wal Mart has the best lighting :lol:
IMG_2004.jpg
 
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flyingpig

Ideal_Rock
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Using the ASET is not as easy as it appears. Taking a picture thru the ASET scope is a whole different topic. I agree. It is PITA. But it helps understanding how a diamond reflects light and how ASET and IS images translate to real life viewing experience. Even diamond vendors struggle with exposure, tilt, and backlight brightness.
 

whitewave

Ideal_Rock
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Using the ASET is not as easy as it appears. Taking a picture thru the ASET scope is a whole different topic. I agree. It is PITA. But it helps understanding how a diamond reflects light and how ASET and IS images translate to real life viewing experience. Even diamond vendors struggle with exposure, tilt, and backlight brightness.
It has been fun practicing! Next, I'll do the IS lol
 

Wink

Ideal_Rock
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It is still showing some excessive leakage on the 6 to 7 and the 9 to ten o'clock edges, but I wonder if that is not also an effect of the slight tilting that I am observing.

In 1993, there were very few of us "cut nuts" around. I am guessing that this diamond served you well until you saw what is now available. Back then there was not even a cut grade system that would help you OR your local jeweler to get you a better cut. Those of us who knew some of what we know now paid dearly for the better cut diamonds, and today they would not make the grade in most cases.

The equipment simply was not available and neither was the knowledge that we have worked so hard to acquire as an industry. Kudos to the AGSL for leading the charge and being completely transparent in sharing their knowledge.

Triangular blatant leakage next to the arrowheads is normal.
So long as it is not "too blatant" those pie shaped wedges of leakage Can actually add to the beneficial contrast as they will flash on and off with the slightest of movements, such as a heart beat. The ASET image is a stationary image of the diamond at the split second it was taken. What makes the diamonds exciting to our eyes is the dark facets and the bright facets and the leakage facets all changing places as the diamond moves, even if seemingly stationary.

There is so much yet to learn about scintillation in our diamonds and to date, NONE of the labs have figured out how to properly measure scintillation.

Wink
 

whitewave

Ideal_Rock
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Joined
Feb 29, 2012
Messages
8,235
It is still showing some excessive leakage on the 6 to 7 and the 9 to ten o'clock edges, but I wonder if that is not also an effect of the slight tilting that I am observing.

In 1993, there were very few of us "cut nuts" around. I am guessing that this diamond served you well until you saw what is now available. Back then there was not even a cut grade system that would help you OR your local jeweler to get you a better cut. Those of us who knew some of what we know now paid dearly for the better cut diamonds, and today they would not make the grade in most cases.

The equipment simply was not available and neither was the knowledge that we have worked so hard to acquire as an industry. Kudos to the AGSL for leading the charge and being completely transparent in sharing their knowledge.



So long as it is not "too blatant" those pie shaped wedges of leakage Can actually add to the beneficial contrast as they will flash on and off with the slightest of movements, such as a heart beat. The ASET image is a stationary image of the diamond at the split second it was taken. What makes the diamonds exciting to our eyes is the dark facets and the bright facets and the leakage facets all changing places as the diamond moves, even if seemingly stationary.

There is so much yet to learn about scintillation in our diamonds and to date, NONE of the labs have figured out how to properly measure scintillation.

Wink
It absolutely cannot compete with today's cuts. Not even close, obviously. We were poor (I was first year teacher and DH was in grad school with no income) and this was a stretch for us to buy and was at the top of the budget for $999 (.75) It was a great engagement ring for 16 years and now it is a pretty pendant.

I don't know if you have heard @Wink but I am awaiting a .56 CBI/HPD as my first taste of a super ideal diamond. :saint::appl:;-):tongue:
 

Wink

Ideal_Rock
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Actually, I might have heard about that. ;-)

One of the things when I first saw your ASET of the pendant was the thought that I wish you would shown us a picture of it first, as it does look like it is a pretty diamond and I am thinking that is it a very attractive pendant, one that has a LOT of feeling and emotion wrapped up in it.

Wink
 

Karl_K

Ideal_Rock
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now if you really want to geek out once you have the lengths of each color right, measure them and replace the red with black and take a look, then replace the green with black and replace the red and take a look.
Then use a black tube and block as much light as possible entering the tube so you only get back lighting.
You will learn something.
 

Karl_K

Ideal_Rock
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Well cut asschers are crazy hard to take get good ASET pictures from, the slightest tilt they change.
 

flyingpig

Ideal_Rock
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Nov 7, 2015
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now if you really want to geek out once you have the lengths of each color right, measure them and replace the red with black and take a look, then replace the green with black and replace the red and take a look.
Then use a black tube and block as much light as possible entering the tube so you only get back lighting.
You will learn something.
I will and post some photos.
I need to find black paper that is not reflective or glossy, which is actually not that easy to find.
 
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