shape
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burnish/flush setting

sunnybunny

Rough_Rock
Joined
May 14, 2013
Messages
23
Hello All,

I have recently decided to start collecting smaller stones (2.5-3mm) and i have an idea for a pendant that would require a burnish/ flush setting. Do you think there would be a problem setting softer stones? Would a 6 on the mohs scale be too soft of a stone to set this way? If it is, is there any other types of ways to set multiple stones that would give the same look? Thanks for any advice you guys can give :bigsmile:
 

Michael_E

Brilliant_Rock
Trade
Joined
Nov 19, 2003
Messages
1,290
All flush setting requires the use of a pointed burnisher to press the metal at the edge of the opening down onto the stone. The burnisher has to be harder than the metal of the setting and is generally made from a polished steel rod. Since this pointed rod is close to, or harder than, stones in the 6 hardness range it is very likely that some of the stones being set will be damaged during setting. This is because normal practice is to use the stone as a guide when burnishing by rubbing the tip of the burnisher on the stone to get the metal down tight on the stone. With diamonds, sapphires and other hard stones this works great, but with soft stones it is very easy to scratch the stone or worse, POP them right in half. My advice is to stick with stones in the hardness range of 8 or so when planning flush setting.

Of course you can always torture a setter by getting them to agree to set little tanzanites, or worse, apatites in this way. It's enough to make me sweat profusely at the mere thought of it. :-o
 

sunnybunny

Rough_Rock
Joined
May 14, 2013
Messages
23
Thanks Michael! I had a feeling that was the case. I did have a tanzanite and demantoid i wanted set... :shock: Maybe i can think of another way.
 

chrono

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 22, 2004
Messages
38,286
You can have a pseudo burnished look by having them set into the metal but the stones are actually held by teeny tiny prongs. I remember the thread but cannot find it now. Perhaps someone else will have better luck but it is a small round demantoid that looks as though it is gypset into a plain gold band.
 

chrono

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 22, 2004
Messages
38,286
I found it whilst looking for something else.

gold_knot_demantoid.jpg
 

sunnybunny

Rough_Rock
Joined
May 14, 2013
Messages
23
Thanks Chrono. I can hardly see the prongs. The only thing i worry about is that i wanted to set multiple stones in one pendant and wonder if they would be able to do them all in that style. But i am still collecting gems :naughty: so i still have time to figure things out.
 

Michael_E

Brilliant_Rock
Trade
Joined
Nov 19, 2003
Messages
1,290
Demantoid is not a problem usually. Tanzanite might be O.K., if the setter is very careful, (make sure to have a few extra stones available, just for good luck). Setting with small beads is a little easier than flush setting, but you still have the problem of the pressure from the bead popping the edge of a soft stone. With an actual prong you can control the angle that the pressure is applied at, but with little beads or a burnish set, the pressure against the stone is almost always right against the upper girdle edge. If you cut a bevel along the upper girdle edge, your chances of setting well go way up, but doing this to a bunch of small soft stones is very time consuming and so relatively expensive.
If your design is to be custom, you might consider having the setting made so that the stones are set from behind. This involves making longer prongs behind each stone so that the stone is pushed into it's seat from the back side. The prong only touches the stone on the surface of a pavilion facet and so has much less risk of damage. It doesn't work for a ring, but for a pendant it works pretty well.
 

movie zombie

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 20, 2005
Messages
11,879
Chrono|1399643804|3669011 said:
I found it whilst looking for something else.

nice find, Chrono!
 

T L

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Sep 20, 2008
Messages
24,824
I've even seen diamonds chipped in flush settings, so it's not something I would recommend for a soft stone at all.
 

Lee Little

Shiny_Rock
Trade
Joined
Jun 25, 2007
Messages
429
Flush settings are difficult to feel confident about, I have seen more of them fall out than any other style. Good to do the final inspection with high magnification.
 
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