shape
carat
color
clarity
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. PriceScope Upgrade Completed
    For issues, questions and comments click the link below
    https://www.pricescope.com/community/threads/pricescope-upgraded-comments-and-issues.229551/

    Dismiss Notice

Antique ring

Discussion in 'Antique and Vintage Jewelry' started by mrweaseluv, Jan 7, 2012.

  1. mrweaseluv
    Rough_Rock

    Messages:
    3
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2012
    by mrweaseluv » Jan 7, 2012
    I bought this ring for my girl, and have been trying to trace down some of it's "history" the center marquise is not. The center stone is actualy 2 .50ct shield cut stones with .38ct in bagettes and 2 .2ct marquise on the side of the center stone. The setting is a 1840 "hinged ring" that no longer has it's hinge (removed at some point to "resize" the ring) As the center stones are a very unusual cut I was actualy hoping to find more info than I have been able too. So now I post here and ask if anyone might know more then I have been able to find. Stones are all VS G. Please any additional information would be greatly appreaciated.

    IMG_1111.jpg

    IMG_1114.jpg

    IMG_1117.jpg

    IMG_1118.jpg
     
  2. Upgradable
    Ideal_Rock

    Messages:
    5,537
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2004
    by Upgradable » Jan 7, 2012
    I'm sorry to tell you that ring is NOT from the 1800's. I would guess 1980's.
     
  3. anne_h
    Brilliant_Rock

    Messages:
    802
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2005
    by anne_h » Jan 7, 2012
    Agreed. This looks like a modern piece. I'm sorry if someone's misled you.

    Anne
     
  4. mrweaseluv
    Rough_Rock

    Messages:
    3
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2012
    by mrweaseluv » Jan 11, 2012
    on the dating of the ring the patent number is registered at 1841, and the ring is numbered (12) so I am almost 100% positive of the age of the ring. It was however "remade" at a later date (replacing pearls with the 2 center diamonds and likely this is when the hinge was removed from the bottom) Also it bears the gold carat marking (indicating 10k gold) that has not been used since about the 1920s (as well as the remake marking that states it tests out at 14k rather then 10k)
     
  5. kelpie
    Ideal_Rock

    Messages:
    2,362
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    by kelpie » Jan 11, 2012
    It sounds like the current iteration was pieced together over the years. Besides just the styling, I would also seriously doubt it is from the 1800's since white gold as an alloy was not commonly done until the 20th century. Are you in UK? It looks like there might be some UK hallmarks in there which can give away a lot of detail if they are readable.
     
  6. jewelerman
    Ideal_Rock

    Messages:
    3,101
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2007
    by jewelerman » Jan 12, 2012
    I'm also sorry that you have been mislead.This is a modern made ring from the late 1980s to the mid 1990s.There is nothing antique about this ring's manufacture.There was a period in the 1990s where shield cut diamonds were being used to keep the price down on a larger marquise center.I showed and sold many rings that looked like this back in the day.In 30 plus years of dealing with modern and true antique jewelry from the 1800's I can assure you that this is not antique.Sorry.
     
  7. jewelerman
    Ideal_Rock

    Messages:
    3,101
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2007
    by jewelerman » Jan 12, 2012
    i looked up the patient information on the shank of the ring. This patient was for Davida Enterprises and was originally dated in 1996 and finalized in July 1997.The shank used was originally designed to hold an open door hinge used for women with arthritis.
     
  8. stci
    Ideal_Rock

    Messages:
    2,514
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2007
    by stci » Jan 12, 2012
    I love love elongated marquise! Beautiful!
     
  9. Amys Bling
    Super_Ideal_Rock

    Messages:
    11,025
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2010
    by Amys Bling » Jan 12, 2012
    It's lovely- but I'm afraid more modern than you think.
     

Share This Page