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Advice on 1.41ct round diamond

tr_do2

Rough_Rock
Joined
May 16, 2021
Messages
2
Hello,

I’m in the process of searching for diamonds through a family friend in the wholesale diamond /jewelry business and landed on this given my parameters (around 1.4ct, G, VS2/SI1): 1.41 ct, H, SL1, excellent cut. I put the diamond through the HCA and was 2.3. I know it’s usually recommended anything over 2 is rejected. In person the diamond looked nice w/ inclusions only noticeable w/ loupe but not sure if I’m missing anything? Price would be 8.3k. Am I missing on significant “brilliance” and sparkle by going with this? Thanks!

5E93AE1F-53C8-47A6-9060-35FD3A0E3E1A.jpeg
 

DejaWiz

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Apr 23, 2021
Messages
113
I think the higher crown angle may give it a bit more fire/sparkle at the expense of some brilliance, but that's a guess based on certain parameters... It all comes down to how it looks through your own eyes.

The price is very in line with some online retailers (but a little bit higher than others) for the specs, so if it looks like a winner to you, then I think it would be a very fair deal.
 

daisygrl

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Dec 30, 2019
Messages
756
Is the jeweler able to get you more advanced images, pictures, videos, including IS/ASET? If he has a wholesale jewelry business, he should be able to do so. Numbers do not always mean much.

I would be wary of SI1 and "clouds not shown" if I were you. That does not always sound too good but if you are ok with all that, and do not care for the advanced images but you do need a certain size and color, the price is fair.
 

musicloveranthony

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Feb 1, 2014
Messages
295
Throwing out anything over 2 HCA feels absurd. There are better reasons to discard this choice, though. The Si1 clarity with clouds not shown tells me it's likely to be milky appearing
 
Last edited:

tr_do2

Rough_Rock
Joined
May 16, 2021
Messages
2
Thank you for all this helpful info! I agree the >2 not being viable seemed a bit excessive. Also good call on the 2014 report seeing that made me a bit worried my inexperience was missing something being off about the diamond, despite it looking ok in person. I’ll talk it over with the guy and see what can happen regarding an updated report. Thanks very much!
 

lovedogs

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jul 31, 2014
Messages
13,205
Throwing out anything over 2 HCA feels absurd. There are better reasons to discard this choice, though. The Si1 clarity with clouds not shown tells me it's likely to be milky appearing
I don't think that's always true. That *IS* usually true when the report says "clarity based on clouds not shown", but that isn't what this says.
 

sledge

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 23, 2018
Messages
5,101
Throwing out anything over 2 HCA feels absurd.
Thank you for all this helpful info! I agree the >2 not being viable seemed a bit excessive.

It really helps to understand the HCA is a prediction tool. It analyzes 17 of the 57 facets of a round diamond and makes a reasonable assumption to the cut quality by examining how the various proportions work in relation to one another.

While it gets us in the ballpark, there are some limitations:
  • It doesn't account for the other 40 minor facets. These can make or break a stone.
  • It can be overly generous (IMO) to shallow stones.
  • The prediction is limited to the data that is input, which is primarily taken from a grading report. Most of that being GIA 3x stones that are averaged & rounded. This is especially important when pushing the fringe on what is acceptable as actual values could push you into unacceptable territory.
So why do we use it? Because most people don't fully understand how the proportions work individually, but more importantly in relation to one another. If you think of it this way, all those proportions ultimately tell us how light enters a stone and reflects and leaves. Changing one or more of the proportions can yield in similar pathways. Take for instance the following picture, that shows a diamond in blue and one in red. They both have similar light paths, but will have different proportions to obtain that same light path.

1621230547855.png

On the flip side of that, when proportions aren't well aligned with one another, you get reflections that create leakage or obstruction. This chart helps illustrate some of those scenarios.

D44B301C-8C3F-4A6C-B1EB-1CCDDD0BEB53.jpeg

Lastly, I might add that scores 0-1 are typically recommended for earrings & pendants. Scores 1-2 for e-rings. And in stones that exhibit excellent H&A quality symmetry scores 2-3 can also work. This is plainly noted on the HCA page.

Capture2.PNG

So while it may not be perfect, it gets us in the ballpark. Especially those that don't understand how proportions work. It has useful functionality. However, advanced images and/or reports can tell us more regardless the HCA score.

This video explores how such advanced data can help solidify a purchase decision.

 

distracts

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Oct 11, 2011
Messages
5,774
It really helps to understand the HCA is a prediction tool. It analyzes 17 of the 57 facets of a round diamond and makes a reasonable assumption to the cut quality by examining how the various proportions work in relation to one another.

While it gets us in the ballpark, there are some limitations:
  • It doesn't account for the other 40 minor facets. These can make or break a stone.
  • It can be overly generous (IMO) to shallow stones.
  • The prediction is limited to the data that is input, which is primarily taken from a grading report. Most of that being GIA 3x stones that are averaged & rounded. This is especially important when pushing the fringe on what is acceptable as actual values could push you into unacceptable territory.
So why do we use it? Because most people don't fully understand how the proportions work individually, but more importantly in relation to one another. If you think of it this way, all those proportions ultimately tell us how light enters a stone and reflects and leaves. Changing one or more of the proportions can yield in similar pathways. Take for instance the following picture, that shows a diamond in blue and one in red. They both have similar light paths, but will have different proportions to obtain that same light path.

1621230547855.png

On the flip side of that, when proportions aren't well aligned with one another, you get reflections that create leakage or obstruction. This chart helps illustrate some of those scenarios.

D44B301C-8C3F-4A6C-B1EB-1CCDDD0BEB53.jpeg

Lastly, I might add that scores 0-1 are typically recommended for earrings & pendants. Scores 1-2 for e-rings. And in stones that exhibit excellent H&A quality symmetry scores 2-3 can also work. This is plainly noted on the HCA page.

Capture2.PNG

So while it may not be perfect, it gets us in the ballpark. Especially those that don't understand how proportions work. It has useful functionality. However, advanced images and/or reports can tell us more regardless the HCA score.

This video explores how such advanced data can help solidify a purchase decision.


This is a really good description of all of this.
 
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