Articles about Diamond Grading

The Camera May Not Lie - But it Tells Different Truths

I have been in the jewelry business since 1970 when I bought my first gemstone for a girlfriend in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Within days I was buying & selling gems and my lifelong love affair and study of gemology was started. I graduated from the Gemological Institute of America in 1975, and have been a proud member of the trade ever since.

Laboratory Cut Grades: What the report doesn’t show

What the report doesn’t show

 

To the naked eye a D Flawless diamond can appear identical to an F VS diamond if each has been cut the same way.  Alternately, less than one degree of variation in two diamonds’ facet measurements can make a noticeable difference in appearance - yet both could be issued the same cut grade from a given lab.

60/60 or ideal cut. How do you know what to choose?

Recently, I had the opportunity to examine two very similar diamonds, one cut to near Tolkowsky ideal AGS0 specifications and one cut to near what dealers refer to as 60/60 make. 60/60 refers to 60% table, 60% depth. Diamond dealers would consider both of these cut styles as very good cutting, but the ideal spec stone has a distinct advantage in the Internet marketplace. It got me thinking about why that is the case. Both of these diamond looked very good and not all that different than one another. Why does one, the ideal cut, hold such an advantage?

Buying Diamonds: Consumers’ Problems and a Solution

Buying Diamonds:

Consumers’ Problems and a Solution

By Sergey Sivovolenko, Janak Mistry, Garry Holloway and Dr Yuri Shelementiev

Do the pavilion mains drive light return in the modern round brilliant?

On many websites you will see it said that the pavilion main facets drive light return. Top labs and many grading systems use the pavilion angle as a basis for assigning a cut grade.

Is this correct?